CPU temp and that gel on the heat-sink?


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Ok, so I have recently made my first computer (still in the process)

I have a Intel Core i5 2500K @ 3.30GHz and it came with the heat-sink, my case has a temp probe and I had already applied the head-sink to the CPU and then removed it for the probe to go in, the gel on the heat-sink has 'melted' to the CPU (guessing its meant to do this tho?) after reading that its a BAD idea to put the probe ON the CPU I removed it. Should I get a new pad/gel and start over so the transfer is good and there is no 'hot spot'?

The processor runs around 45-50 °C under average load (surfing the net, d'loading and installing updates etc...) is this a good temp or a bad temp to run at?

about 30 °C idel

I have 4 case fans and the heat-sink fan on at all times as I'm way to scared to over heat and kill the computer, am I being over paranoid?
I got the temp reading from Speccy.


Cheers - Toshax
 
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According to Intel,the maximum recomended temprature for i5-2500k is 72.6 degree Celsius.So yours is good.
http://communities.intel.com/thread/24346

Change the gel if you are sure you messed it up during installation
Don't let the temperature hit the 80 degree Celsius mark.Most processors can withstand up to 99 degree after it start to burn
 
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Thanks for the info Amaltom61, I think I will get a thermal pad and redo when i get chance, everything seems to be A ok so far.
 
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well the case has 3 built in (one side two front) and I added one at the back :lol: didnt want to over heat everything lmfao
 

Digerati

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I removed it. Should I get a new pad/gel and start over so the transfer is good and there is no 'hot spot'?
Once TIM - thermal interface material cures (usually after a couple days or a few heat up/cool down cycles), it should always be replaced if the heatsink is removed or the bond is knocked or twisted loose. And you should ensure the mating surfaces are thoroughly cleaned before applying new TIM. And of course, the TIM should be in as thin a layer as possible, while still covering the die. You only need to fill the microscopic pits and valleys to push out trapped insulating air. Any extra is in the way.

And of course, don't forget to unplug from the wall and touch bare metal of the case interior before reaching in to prevent ESD damage.

Under 50°C is great! I don't start to get nervous until my temps touch and stay above 60°C. That is usually an indication I need to wash out my air filters.
 
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Nibiru2012

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Hello Toshax! Welcome to the Windows 7 Forums website!

Let's take a look at what you're stating and the issues you have.


  • 1. As Digerati stated, under 50 Deg. C is a good CPU temperature. So don't worry.
  • 2. Having four case is perfectly normal and acceptable, I have built over 25 computers myself and repaired over 200. As long as the fans don't make excessive noise then you're fine.
  • 3. Also as Digerati stated, anytime you break the T.I.M. (thermal interface material) bond between the CPU and heatsink you should remove the old TIM and apply new, regardless of how long it has been there.
  • 4. DO NOT use thermal pads, they're not that efficient and have a greater tendency to age quicker, dry out and crack creating more problems. The majority of thermal pads have a paraffin base which evaporates over time. I know because I have seen this quite a few time in the past.
  • 5. Use a good high quality TIM such as Arctic Silver Ceramique which needs about 100 hours of break-in time to effectively bond. I recommend using Prolimatech PRO Thermal Compound which is amongst the top 3 TIMs reviewed and tested, in addition it does not require any break-in time at all. Plus with this product a little bit goes a long way.
  • 6. The use of temperature probes is extraneous and not necessary. There is a temperature sensor in the CPU itself plus usually one on the motherboard.
  • 7. To clean the CPU surface and heatsink use a good solvent such as 90% Isopropyl Alcohol or similar.
Following these tips will help you out immensely. Also 30 deg. C is hard to achieve unless you're using a water-cooling setup. Some of the very high-end air coolers can get there, but their just as expensive as a good water-cooling setup.
 

Digerati

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The majority of thermal pads have a paraffin base which evaporates over time.
It does evaporate over time, but note that time period is (or better be!!!) but a couple scant seconds - not days, months or years.

The pads are indeed paraffin based and BY FAR, are MUCH better than no TIM at all. The pads Intel and AMD use on their OEM coolers are actually very good, and perfectly suitable for the vast majority of users - even with moderate overclocking (and proper case cooling). But I cannot say the same thing for 3rd party pads.

The OEM pads from Intel and AMD use a quality, special, rapid-melt, extremely low viscosity (very runny) paraffin (when melted) and what happens is the very first time the CPU is powered on, it very quickly heats up and melts the paraffin. The force applied by the heatsink mounting brackets causes the paraffin to squish out, leaving the TIM molecules behind.

In theory, and for the most part, in practice, that works just fine because the paraffin evaporates and the user is good to go.

However, I don't like the pads either. My problem is two-fold - though admittedly it may all be in my head - but here's how I convinced myself I am right.
1. I don't like the "idea" of nearly-impossible-to-clean excess paraffin being squished out and maybe running onto the CPU socket. I have never seen that happen - but don't want to either.

2. IF the mounting bracket has a defect or the assembler failed to ensure the bracket is securely fastened, there may not be enough "squishing" pressure to allow the paraffin to quickly get out of the way so the TIM can spread out and do its thing. An unprotected CPU can almost instantly overheat. While the CPU "should" self-protect itself, I am just not comfortable enough to see if it would. With paste, it is already spread out, and therefore might (in my head, anyway) provide some heat transfer capability.​
So I always replace the TIM pads on all my builds with a good paste.

Having said all that, it should be noted that in TIM reviews like this one of over 80 TIM products, the difference from worst to best is less than 6°C! My point is, the use of TIM is more important than which TIM. If you need that 6° to keep your CPU stable, then you have other problems, like inadequate front-to-back flow of cool air being provided by your case.
 
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thanks for all the great replies, I will be investing in some good TIM asap, but what does OEM, 'Original equipment manufacturer' in other-words stock parts?

Anyhow I am getting my SSD nextweek (if i can decide which one) so I will pick some nice TIM paste up at the same time and redo it, will somehting like whitespirit be a good cleaner for the old stuff or is it too weak?


- this is what the heat sink looks like under (before it got squished out that is!)
 

Digerati

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As suggested above, 90% (I think it comes as 91 - 93%, depending on the maker) isopropyl alcohol is your best option. I would not use any petroleum based products or "spirits". They might leave a film, or be overly corrosive if you got sloppy and get some on the board or socket. The alcohol is cheap and found at any local pharmacy/drug store.

A thumbnail is also good for scraping off the bulk of the pad as it will not scratch the metal.
 
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Nibiru2012

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Toshax, the Kingston drive is a decent drive but IMHO it's too small even for a boot drive.

The Samsung 830 series are rock solid, very fast and use ALL Samsung parts no 3rd party parts at all. Samsung memory is amongst the best in the world and these 830 series SSDs get top reviews.

Here's one that is not that much more money and twice the capacity of the Kingston: http://www.cclonline.com/product/79...ng-64GB-830-Series-Solid-State-Drive/HDD1431/

Keep us posted!

~Nibs
 
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why do you spent money on small SSD where you can get large HDD for almost the same price or lower
 
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The point would be to use both together for the benefit that they both provide. Use an SSD for its speed and a HDD for its mass storage.
exactly, SSD for boot drive also makes windows score 7.9 :)

I'm also wonder what people recommend in terms of graphics cards for around 200 GBP at least 1gb ram?
 
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Nibiru2012

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why do you spet money on small SSD where you can get large HDD for almost the same price or lower
Because an SSD is a hell of lot faster than a hard drive, even a SATA III hard drive. Use the hard drive(s) for storage only. :D
 
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I just ran the FAH client for SMP and my cpu use is at 100% is it a bad idea to run it at 100% all the time? lol if so ill set it to one core
 

Digerati

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is it a bad idea to run it at 100% all the time?
If you know and authorize whatever is pushing it that hard, then it is not a problem - as long as it is properly cooled.
 
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yodap

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I just ran the FAH client for SMP and my cpu use is at 100% is it a bad idea to run it at 100% all the time? lol if so ill set it to one core
I run dedicated folding rigs @100% 24/7. You can control the [email protected] client to certain extent either through the client itself or windows. Respond to this post if you're interested. I started folding for this team again, I think we need to resurrect it some.:D
 

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