Call of Duty 4 Modern Warfare Multi-player startup crash etc.


C

Chuck

Since there isn't a group for win 7 games yet--
Seems that the "standard" Win 7 audio drivers do not include a "Stereo
Mixer" module that if not present, causes the multi player mode to
crash. Since this is usually an on motherboard sound chip, the best
place to get the driver is usually the MBD Mfrs web site.
I use an ASUS M4A79 Deluxe MBD, and the MBD is new enough that the ASUS
web site has some of the references to get to the drivers incomplete.The
file for this MBD is ALC1200_Audio_V6015859_Windows7.zip for 32b Win 7.
 
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J

Joel

Chuck said:
Since there isn't a group for win 7 games yet--
Seems that the "standard" Win 7 audio drivers do not include a "Stereo
Mixer" module that if not present, causes the multi player mode to
crash. Since this is usually an on motherboard sound chip, the best
place to get the driver is usually the MBD Mfrs web site.
I use an ASUS M4A79 Deluxe MBD, and the MBD is new enough that the ASUS
web site has some of the references to get to the drivers incomplete.The
file for this MBD is ALC1200_Audio_V6015859_Windows7.zip for 32b Win 7.

You could try:

http://www.realtek.com.tw/DOWNLOADS/downloadsView.aspx?Langid=1&PNid=24&PFid=24&Level=4&Conn=3&DownTypeID=3&GetDown=false

It was released very recently, unlike the ASUS version.
 
C

Chuck

While I really prefer to use "generic" drivers when possible, the ASUS
site had a decent download rate, and the Realtek sites were very slow.
That notwithstanding, the real reason for installing the sound mixer
seems to be that it marks the mike as usable, even if not plugged in.
Others have reported that plugging in a mike may also solve the problem.
(With/Without the sound mixwe module?)

Just another case of Microsoft including less than the full driver
package for a device. Plus, there have been some instances of an
incorrect realtek driver download via windows update for some P/Cs.

Never the less, thanks for the url.
 
M

MJMIII

Chuck said:
While I really prefer to use "generic" drivers when possible, the ASUS
site had a decent download rate, and the Realtek sites were very slow.
That notwithstanding, the real reason for installing the sound mixer seems
to be that it marks the mike as usable, even if not plugged in.
Others have reported that plugging in a mike may also solve the problem.
(With/Without the sound mixwe module?)

Just another case of Microsoft including less than the full driver package
for a device. Plus, there have been some instances of an incorrect realtek
driver download via windows update for some P/Cs.

Never the less, thanks for the url.
The rule of thumb is to never download and install Microsoft hardware
drivers unless they're for a Microsoft device.
 
C

Chuck

The rule of thumb is to never download and install Microsoft hardware
drivers unless they're for a Microsoft device.
--
That's a bit extreme. There can be problems if you don't start with the
MS provided drivers. Poorly written or "packaged" Mfrs drivers
sometimes require stuff that only gets installed when the MS drivers are
installed first, usually a result of a new windows install.

Re-installs have another set of peculiarities.
 
M

MJMIII

Chuck said:
That's a bit extreme. There can be problems if you don't start with the
MS provided drivers. Poorly written or "packaged" Mfrs drivers
sometimes require stuff that only gets installed when the MS drivers are
installed first, usually a result of a new windows install.

Re-installs have another set of peculiarities.
That's NOT extreme. Trolling the M$ newsgroups and forums show a very large
percentage of hardware errors are caused by Microsoft's version of
manufacturer's drivers. Common sense should tell you to only load new
drivers from the people who made your particular piece of hardware,
especially sound and video hardware. I've never seen any proof that you
must load a version of a M$ driver before installing a mfrs driver. I
believe in this you're wrong.
 
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C

Char Jackson

That's NOT extreme. Trolling the M$ newsgroups and forums show a very large
percentage of hardware errors are caused by Microsoft's version of
manufacturer's drivers. Common sense should tell you to only load new
drivers from the people who made your particular piece of hardware,
especially sound and video hardware. I've never seen any proof that you
must load a version of a M$ driver before installing a mfrs driver. I
believe in this you're wrong.
Definitely wrong. Microsoft drivers for 3rd party hardware frequently
provides limited functionality. Whenever possible, go for the real
drivers versus the Microsoft generic drivers. If the 3rd party drivers
are available, there's absolutely no need or benefit to loading the
Microsoft drivers first.
 
C

Chuck

"That's NOT extreme"

I stand behind my opinion, based upon a fair amount of experience.
(OEM/VAR/Beta Test/Software development/etc.)
All of these items at one time or another depended upon MS drivers or
drivers via MS.
Hard Drives
Tape Drives
Video cards
Sound chips and cards.
Mice and trackballs
Video cameras
Even some scanners.


There have been multiple areas in the various windows versions
that benefited from the initial loading of MS drivers.
Perhaps the most widespread had to do with printing and spooling.
 
C

Char Jackson

"That's NOT extreme"

I stand behind my opinion, based upon a fair amount of experience.
(OEM/VAR/Beta Test/Software development/etc.)
All of these items at one time or another depended upon MS drivers or
drivers via MS.
Hard Drives
Tape Drives
Video cards
Sound chips and cards.
Mice and trackballs
Video cameras
Even some scanners.
What you're saying isn't true for any of the categories of hardware
that you've listed, and hasn't been true since at least the Win 95
days. I don't plan to argue about what may or may not have been the
case in the pre-95 days, so I offer you that graceful exit, if you'd
like.
There have been multiple areas in the various windows versions
that benefited from the initial loading of MS drivers.
Perhaps the most widespread had to do with printing and spooling.
Now you've identified the hardware category that benefits MOST from
using the proper drivers from the various manufacturers. Using
Microsoft drivers for this category of hardware is going to be
consistently disappointing.
 
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M

MJMIII

Chuck said:
"That's NOT extreme"

I stand behind my opinion, based upon a fair amount of experience.
(OEM/VAR/Beta Test/Software development/etc.)
All of these items at one time or another depended upon MS drivers or
drivers via MS.
Hard Drives
Tape Drives
Video cards
Sound chips and cards.
Mice and trackballs
Video cameras
Even some scanners.


There have been multiple areas in the various windows versions
that benefited from the initial loading of MS drivers.
Perhaps the most widespread had to do with printing and spooling.
Tell you what, Chuck. You win. Download and install every M$ hardware
driver you come across for your system, but I'll crucify you on every
problem post you'll be making. Your statement may have been true in the
late 80's, but you're way off base now.
 

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