Anything Wrong With Having 2 Anti-Virus Programs Active


R

Ricky Jimenez

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
 
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S

Stephen Wolstenholme

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
Get MSE, it's free and updated as frequently as you want.

Steve

--
Neural network software applications, help and support.

Neural Network Software. http://www.npsl1.com
EasyNN-plus. Neural Networks plus. http://www.easynn.com
SwingNN. Forecast with Neural Networks. http://www.swingnn.com
JustNN. Just Neural Networks. http://www.justnn.com
 
W

Wolf K

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
IMO, you shouldn't run two programs simultaneously, but you can have
several on your machine.

I follow this general rule: have 4-6 different anti-malware programs on
your machine, but set only one for active defence. At intervals
depending on your vulnerability run the others one at a time. Disconnect
from the web and shut down active protection first.

Vulnerability is in part a function do your ISP's spam filtering
technology. I get very little spam as my ISP has realised that blocking
if before it gets to its customers frees up bandwidth. Downside: I have
to check the web mail portal from time to time to find whatever legit
mail that's blocked. Small price to pay.

HTH
Wolf K.
 
B

Bruce Hagen

Ricky Jimenez said:
I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.

MBAM is not an anti-virus program so it will not conflict with Norton.
That said, I would never have anything made by Norton or McAfee on any of
my machines. Even when they work, they are resource hogs.
 
B

Big Steel

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
I run Microsoft Security Essentials and PCtool's Spyware Doctor in real
time scanning with no problem with each having their different jobs to
do. I also run Sophos's Anti-Rootkit manually that has its own purpose.

MSE has stopped attacks coming from Web sites, which I feel does a
better job that NOD32 did, and Spyware Doctor has also stopped attacks
from Web sites along with blocking access to known bad sites.
 
S

Satanic Mechanic ©

I run Microsoft Security Essentials and PCtool's Spyware Doctor in real
time scanning with no problem with each having their different jobs to
do. I also run Sophos's Anti-Rootkit manually that has its own purpose.

MSE has stopped attacks coming from Web sites, which I feel does a
better job that NOD32 did, and Spyware Doctor has also stopped attacks
from Web sites along with blocking access to known bad sites.
Norton 360 will find virii and also malware. Malwarebytes will only
find malware, so technically both are not anit-virus programs. i'd
say ren em both
 
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Big Steel

Norton 360 will find virii and also malware. Malwarebytes will only
find malware, so technically both are not anit-virus programs. i'd
say ren em both
Do you want to explain what this has to do with my post?
 
S

Satanic Mechanic ©

Do you want to explain what this has to do with my post?
wtf are you talking about? the top poster asked if you could run both
and i gave you an answer. i though i was nice enuff to bother
answering his question. i really did not care about your post at all.
it was his post i was replying to. sabe vovoso?
 
J

Jolly polly

Bruce Hagen said:
MBAM is not an anti-virus program so it will not conflict with Norton.
That said, I would never have anything made by Norton or McAfee on any of
my machines. Even when they work, they are resource hogs.

The answer to the question in the subject line is: Yes, you don't want two
anti-virus programs installed at the same time. At best they will fight each
other and slow your computer to a crawl. At worst it'll be unusable.

You must understand what these programs do, in order to determine whether or
not to install them and when to run them. As Bruce says Malwarebytes, for
example is not an anti-virus program. You need to learn what a virus,
Trojan, worm, spyware, cookies, malware etc. are, and how each deals with,
or does not deal with each threat. But don't get paranoid
 
B

Bruce Hagen

Jolly polly said:
The answer to the question in the subject line is: Yes, you don't want
two anti-virus programs installed at the same time. At best they will
fight each other and slow your computer to a crawl. At worst it'll be
unusable.

You must understand what these programs do, in order to determine
whether or not to install them and when to run them. As Bruce says
Malwarebytes, for example is not an anti-virus program. You need to
learn what a virus, Trojan, worm, spyware, cookies, malware etc. are,
and how each deals with, or does not deal with each threat. But don't
get paranoid

You didn't reply to the OP. :)
 
Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

Satanic said:
wtf are you talking about? the top poster asked if you could run both
and i gave you an answer. i though i was nice enuff to bother
answering his question. i really did not care about your post at all.
it was his post i was replying to. sabe vovoso?
Looks like you are the vovoso since you replied to Big Steel's post,
not the top / original post.
 
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B

Big Steel

wtf are you talking about? the top poster asked if you could run both
and i gave you an answer. i though i was nice enuff to bother
answering his question. i really did not care about your post at all.
it was his post i was replying to. sabe vovoso?
WTF your ass post to the poster and not me you clown. Do you see anyone
like a jackass chaining on anyone else's post in this thread?
 
B

Big Steel

Looks like you are the vovoso since you replied to Big Steel's post,
not the top / original post.
That damn Satanic Mechanic clown WTF is its problem? The hypocrite
chains on me, and then it turns around and makes a direct post to me
bitching.
 
K

Ken Blake

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.

Yes, it is very bad to have two anti-virus programs running at once.
They can cause slowdowns and problems as they conflict with each
other.

*However*, note that MalwareBytes AntiMalware is *not* an anti-virus
program; it's an anti-spyware program, so having it run alongside an
anti-virus is not a problem.

Two additional points:

1. As far as I'm concerned, Norton is among the worst choices of an
anti-virus program. There are several better choices, including three
free ones--Avira AntiVir, Avast, and Microsoft Security Essentials.

2. A word about the terminology: you may think there is danger in
their both running at once because both are anti-malware programs.
Yes, despite how often some people misuse the term, they are both
anti-malware.

Despite what many people think, "malware" doesn't mean spyware in
particular. The word "malware" is short for "MALicious softWARE." It
refers to all types of malicious software, including viruses, worms,
trojan horses, rootkits, spyware, adware, etc. So there's never any
reason to speak about "viruses *and* malware" since "malware" includes
viruses.

By the way, the word "virus" means "self-replicating software." A
self-replicating program doesn't *have* to be malicious in intent, but
for all practical purposes, all viruses are malicious, and therefore
classify as malware.
 
Z

Zaidy036

I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
Not good practice to run two AVs at the same time.

That said one program offers just this. Look at Immunet (free or paid)
available from
http://www.immunet.com/free/index.html

I use other progams like Malwarebytes and Ad-Aware to scan once a week
but NOT running as realtime protection. Win 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
W

...winston

N360 is an full mega-suite program (Anti -> virus, spyware, phishing, botnets etc.)
MBAM is a free or fee based application (the former does not run real time thus is only an after-the-fact approach to remove worms,
trojans, rootkits, rogues, dialers, spyware, etc.; the fee base version can be run stand-alone or resident)

Thus with your preferred AV suite, N360, being a full featured security suite most would suggest to run MBAM in manual mode as
supplement (e.g. daily, weekly, etc.) to N360.
Also note that 'danger' or conflicts between running similar applications may not be immediately noticeable but they can and do
exist thus the prevailing opinion is to not run the same type of programs concurrently (resident, in the background etc.).

Yes, N360 is not cheap..in most cases if preferring N360, it's may actually be cheaper to purchase the suite each year vs. renew
the defs since the retail pricing (big box, web sites) can be quite a few dollars cheaper than the def renewal (via the program or
Symantec online)

You'll find a lot of naysayers complaining about Norton products many of those same respondents not having used, tested or
installed it for years...i.e. past experience (like an equity on the stock market) might not be indicative of current or future
state even though past experience may have been valid at a point in time. With that in mind, full featured suites (including N360
much less resource intensive than in the past but still substantial) have a tendency to have a larger footprint (install size),
reduce system resources due to multiple background applications running resident, increase the possibility of conflicts with other
applications including Windows Updates, and have a much higher learning curve or complexity for many users.

If your use of a full suite program shows a propensity of catching items that jeopardize your system's security, maybe a full suite
and possibly in conjunction with MBAM (free or fee) as a supplement (run periodically in manual mode) will work best for you.

On the other hand --for many users a stand-alone AV program (e.g. MSE, NOD32, NAV) running resident and supplemented with MBAM free
(manual on some periodic basis) is more than sufficient when practicing safe surfing and configuring their browser and mail clients
with default/recommended security settings.

FYI...MSE from Microsoft is free thus if cost is concern, MSE with the free version of MBAM as a supplement might be worth a look.


--
....winston
msft mvp mail


"Ricky Jimenez" wrote in message
I currently have both Norton 360 and Malwarebytes Anti-Malware open on
my computer. Is there any danger in doing this? I think that both
are catching different network attacks but I don't really understand
what they are doing. The Malwarebytes software is much much cheaper.
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

Alias said:
IMO, you shouldn't run two programs simultaneously, but you can have
several on your machine.
[]
whatsoever. Now, having two *anti virus* programs running in real time
is not a good idea.
Leaving aside that the OP has two prog.s with different purposes, it is
frequently said that running two antivirus prog.s at once is a bad idea:
usually it is said that they will fight each other and slow your machine
to a crawl. I'm guessing that at least some of those saying this have
actually experienced this.

What I haven't seen _explained_ is _why_ they should "fight". I can see
that, in order to detect many known viruses, an AV prog. must somehow
have some data file that contains signatures of several common viruses,
in order to compare things against; I can see that another AV prog. will
(or certainly _should!_) detect this datafile as containing several
viruses.

But, apart from detecting each other's data files, what is the reason
why two AV files might "fight"?
 
B

Big Steel

On 2/2/2012 5:27 PM, Satanic Mechanic © wrote:

<snipped>
<yawn>

Go away you clown you are not talking about anything. This is the year
2012 and not the 1990(s) Usenet.
 
B

Big Steel

On 2/2/2012 5:18 PM, Satanic Mechanic © wrote:

<snipped>
<yawn>

Go away you clown you are not talking about anything. This is the year
2012 and not the 1990(s) Usenet.
 
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S

Satanic Mechanic ©

On 2/2/2012 5:18 PM, Satanic Mechanic © wrote:

<snipped>
<yawn>

Go away you clown you are not talking about anything. This is the year
2012 and not the 1990(s) Usenet.
when you yawn with your big fat mouth open, make sure to put a nice
pulsing cock in it. i am done responding to you or anyone else. i
will be smarter and sit here in my office chuckling at anyone who
attempts to get me to make a remake due to a lame flame
foad and gfy
 

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