Wireless password (key)?

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Artreid, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. Artreid

    Artreid Guest

    I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password that
    I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    How do find/see my network password
    Artreid, Nov 24, 2012
    #1
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  2. Artreid

    Jeff Layman Guest

    On 24/11/2012 08:40, Artreid wrote:
    > I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password that
    > I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    > How do find/see my network password


    Is there no button which when pressed resets everything to default values?

    --

    Jeff
    Jeff Layman, Nov 24, 2012
    #2
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  3. Artreid

    Richard Guest

    Artreid,

    Click on the "internet connection in the system tray.

    "Right" click on the name of your wireless internet connection.

    Select "Properties".

    On the "Security" tab, there is a "check box" to "show characters". Check
    it.

    You will now see the actual password characters.

    Hope this helps!
    --
    Richard

    "Artreid" <> wrote in message
    news:k8q15r$1t2$...
    > I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    > that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    > How do find/see my network password
    Richard, Nov 24, 2012
    #3
  4. Artreid

    Ammammata Guest

    Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:

    > I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    > that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    > How do find/see my network password


    if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    key view from nirsoft



    --
    /-\ /\/\ /\/\ /-\ /\/\ /\/\ /-\ T /-\
    Ammammata, Nov 24, 2012
    #4
  5. In article <k8qcmh$b95$>, Richard
    <> writes
    >Artreid,
    >
    >Click on the "internet connection in the system tray.
    >
    >"Right" click on the name of your wireless internet connection.
    >
    >Select "Properties".
    >
    >On the "Security" tab, there is a "check box" to "show characters". Check
    >it.
    >
    >You will now see the actual password characters.
    >
    >Hope this helps!


    Just followed those suggestions and it worked for me, not that I needed
    to remember my password, just interested, as an aside my Virgin Media
    supplied Netgear super hub has a reset button which came in useful last
    week when I needed to get back to the default settings after a bit of
    trouble.

    Mike

    --
    Michael Swift We do not regard Englishmen as foreigners.
    Kirkheaton We look on them only as rather mad Norwegians.
    Yorkshire Halvard Lange
    Michael Swift, Nov 25, 2012
    #5
  6. Artreid

    Artreid Guest

    Thnks Muchly, Richard.
    That worked...

    "Richard" wrote in message news:k8qcmh$b95$...

    Artreid,

    Click on the "internet connection in the system tray.

    "Right" click on the name of your wireless internet connection.

    Select "Properties".

    On the "Security" tab, there is a "check box" to "show characters". Check
    it.

    You will now see the actual password characters.

    Hope this helps!
    --
    Richard

    "Artreid" <> wrote in message
    news:k8q15r$1t2$...
    > I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    > that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    > How do find/see my network password
    Artreid, Nov 25, 2012
    #6
  7. Artreid

    Richard Guest

    Thanks for the feedback. I'm glad it worked
    --
    Richard

    "Artreid" <> wrote in message
    news:k8s9i6$93i$...
    > Thnks Muchly, Richard. That worked...
    >
    > "Richard" wrote in message news:k8qcmh$b95$...
    > Artreid,
    >
    > Click on the "internet connection in the system tray.
    >
    > "Right" click on the name of your wireless internet connection.
    >
    > Select "Properties".
    >
    > On the "Security" tab, there is a "check box" to "show characters". Check
    > it.
    >
    > You will now see the actual password characters.
    >
    > Hope this helps!
    > --
    > Richard
    >
    > "Artreid" <> wrote in message
    > news:k8q15r$1t2$...
    >> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >> How do find/see my network password

    >
    >
    Richard, Nov 25, 2012
    #7
  8. Artreid

    Guest

    On 11/24/2012 6:56 AM, Richard wrote:
    > Artreid,
    >
    > Click on the "internet connection in the system tray.
    >
    > "Right" click on the name of your wireless internet connection.
    >
    > Select "Properties".
    >
    > On the "Security" tab, there is a "check box" to "show characters".
    > Check it.
    >
    > You will now see the actual password characters.
    >
    > Hope this helps!

    Scary if you are worried about security.....
    , Nov 25, 2012
    #8
  9. Artreid

    Gordonbp Guest

    On 25/11/12 15:07, d wrote:

    > Scary if you are worried about security.....
    >

    Not at all if you are running as a Standard User (which you should be),
    because you then have to give the Admin password BEFORE the characters
    are revealed...
    Gordonbp, Nov 25, 2012
    #9
  10. On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:

    > Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >
    >> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >> How do find/see my network password

    >
    > if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    > key view from nirsoft


    It's stored in the router.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Nov 27, 2012
    #10
  11. In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    <> writes:
    >On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >
    >> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>
    >>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>> How do find/see my network password

    >>
    >> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >> key view from nirsoft

    >
    >It's stored in the router.
    >

    If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    stored in the computer too (-:.
    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    An Englishman, even if he is alone, forms an orderly queue of one. (George Mikes
    in "How to be an Alien".)
    J. P. Gilliver (John), Nov 27, 2012
    #11
  12. On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:00:11 +0000, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

    > In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    > <> writes:
    >>On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >>
    >>> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>>
    >>>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>>> How do find/see my network password
    >>>
    >>> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >>> key view from nirsoft

    >>
    >>It's stored in the router.
    >>

    > If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    > stored in the computer too (-:.


    :)

    You caught me...

    If I log in to my router from a computer wired to it, I can see the
    password in plain text. Of course, I need to know the password that
    gives me access to the router's setup.

    And of course, as you imply, any device that can connect to the router
    via WiFi has the password in it somewhere, but I hope not in plain text.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Nov 28, 2012
    #12
  13. Artreid

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 16:21:00 -0800, "Gene E. Bloch"
    <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:00:11 +0000, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    >
    >> In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    >> <> writes:
    >>>On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>>>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>>>> How do find/see my network password
    >>>>
    >>>> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >>>> key view from nirsoft
    >>>
    >>>It's stored in the router.
    >>>

    >> If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    >> stored in the computer too (-:.

    >
    >:)
    >
    >You caught me...
    >
    >If I log in to my router from a computer wired to it, I can see the
    >password in plain text. Of course, I need to know the password that
    >gives me access to the router's setup.
    >
    >And of course, as you imply, any device that can connect to the router
    >via WiFi has the password in it somewhere,


    I wonder, would anyone use the same password for both router setup and
    wireless access? I hope not, but I try not to be surprised by such
    things anymore.

    >but I hope not in plain text.


    I don't know how it's stored, but the wireless access password is
    easily viewable by such tools as the one from Nirsoft, and the
    router's setup password can easily be reset to a known value,
    especially if you have physical access to the box.

    --

    Char Jackson
    Char Jackson, Nov 28, 2012
    #13
  14. On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 19:15:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

    > On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 16:21:00 -0800, "Gene E. Bloch"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:00:11 +0000, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    >>> <> writes:
    >>>>On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>>>>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>>>>> How do find/see my network password
    >>>>>
    >>>>> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >>>>> key view from nirsoft
    >>>>
    >>>>It's stored in the router.
    >>>>
    >>> If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    >>> stored in the computer too (-:.

    >>
    >>:)
    >>
    >>You caught me...
    >>
    >>If I log in to my router from a computer wired to it, I can see the
    >>password in plain text. Of course, I need to know the password that
    >>gives me access to the router's setup.
    >>
    >>And of course, as you imply, any device that can connect to the router
    >>via WiFi has the password in it somewhere,

    >
    > I wonder, would anyone use the same password for both router setup and
    > wireless access? I hope not, but I try not to be surprised by such
    > things anymore.


    I use two very different passwords...

    But there are still a few routers whose username and password are the
    default ones :-(

    >>but I hope not in plain text.


    > I don't know how it's stored, but the wireless access password is
    > easily viewable by such tools as the one from Nirsoft, and the
    > router's setup password can easily be reset to a known value,
    > especially if you have physical access to the box.


    I would expect that the Nirsoft tool reads the one on the router, but
    Nir is pretty clever :)

    As I said, I have physical (wired) access to the box, and so I can see
    my wireless password.

    It might be worth noting that since this computer has wired access to
    the router, I haven't entered the wireless password here. That would
    preclude Nirsoft's ability to find that password somewhere on this box &
    decrypt it.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Nov 28, 2012
    #14
  15. On 27/11/2012 5:43 PM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    > On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 19:15:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 16:21:00 -0800, "Gene E. Bloch"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:00:11 +0000, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    >>>> <> writes:
    >>>>> On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>>>>>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>>>>>> How do find/see my network password
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >>>>>> key view from nirsoft
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It's stored in the router.
    >>>>>
    >>>> If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    >>>> stored in the computer too (-:.
    >>>
    >>> :)
    >>>
    >>> You caught me...
    >>>
    >>> If I log in to my router from a computer wired to it, I can see the
    >>> password in plain text. Of course, I need to know the password that
    >>> gives me access to the router's setup.
    >>>
    >>> And of course, as you imply, any device that can connect to the router
    >>> via WiFi has the password in it somewhere,

    >>
    >> I wonder, would anyone use the same password for both router setup and
    >> wireless access? I hope not, but I try not to be surprised by such
    >> things anymore.

    >
    > I use two very different passwords...
    >
    > But there are still a few routers whose username and password are the
    > default ones :-(
    >
    >>> but I hope not in plain text.

    >
    >> I don't know how it's stored, but the wireless access password is
    >> easily viewable by such tools as the one from Nirsoft, and the
    >> router's setup password can easily be reset to a known value,
    >> especially if you have physical access to the box.

    >
    > I would expect that the Nirsoft tool reads the one on the router, but
    > Nir is pretty clever :)
    >
    > As I said, I have physical (wired) access to the box, and so I can see
    > my wireless password.
    >
    > It might be worth noting that since this computer has wired access to
    > the router, I haven't entered the wireless password here. That would
    > preclude Nirsoft's ability to find that password somewhere on this box &
    > decrypt it.
    >

    I have no idea of current practices, but decades ago
    when I was involved in en/decryption, it was customary
    to store not the password, but the encrypted version of
    the password using an encryption method which was one-way:
    the encryption method was well-known, and the user (only)
    new the plaintext password, but no-one (supposedly) could
    reverse the encryption. A distressed user could only set
    a new password after authenticating themselves, and again
    it would not be stored, only its encrypted version to
    compare when the user logged on and their attempt at the
    password was encrypted, hopefully yielding something
    identical to the stored encrypted version. I'd expect
    any current password control method to be equally
    robust.
    Anthony Buckland, Nov 28, 2012
    #15
  16. On Wed, 28 Nov 2012 10:40:23 -0800, Anthony Buckland wrote:

    > On 27/11/2012 5:43 PM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >> On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 19:15:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 16:21:00 -0800, "Gene E. Bloch"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:00:11 +0000, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In message <>, Gene E. Bloch
    >>>>> <> writes:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 17:38:18 +0000 (UTC), Ammammata wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Il Sat, 24 Nov 2012 03:40:31 -0500, Artreid ha scritto:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have this new Comcast wireless router that came with 15diget password
    >>>>>>>> that I changed to. Now I cannot remember what I changed it to.
    >>>>>>>> How do find/see my network password
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> if your password is stored in the computer, you can try with the wireless
    >>>>>>> key view from nirsoft
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It's stored in the router.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> If Artreid is actually using it, but just can't remember it, it must be
    >>>>> stored in the computer too (-:.
    >>>>
    >>>> :)
    >>>>
    >>>> You caught me...
    >>>>
    >>>> If I log in to my router from a computer wired to it, I can see the
    >>>> password in plain text. Of course, I need to know the password that
    >>>> gives me access to the router's setup.
    >>>>
    >>>> And of course, as you imply, any device that can connect to the router
    >>>> via WiFi has the password in it somewhere,
    >>>
    >>> I wonder, would anyone use the same password for both router setup and
    >>> wireless access? I hope not, but I try not to be surprised by such
    >>> things anymore.

    >>
    >> I use two very different passwords...
    >>
    >> But there are still a few routers whose username and password are the
    >> default ones :-(
    >>
    >>>> but I hope not in plain text.

    >>
    >>> I don't know how it's stored, but the wireless access password is
    >>> easily viewable by such tools as the one from Nirsoft, and the
    >>> router's setup password can easily be reset to a known value,
    >>> especially if you have physical access to the box.

    >>
    >> I would expect that the Nirsoft tool reads the one on the router, but
    >> Nir is pretty clever :)
    >>
    >> As I said, I have physical (wired) access to the box, and so I can see
    >> my wireless password.
    >>
    >> It might be worth noting that since this computer has wired access to
    >> the router, I haven't entered the wireless password here. That would
    >> preclude Nirsoft's ability to find that password somewhere on this box &
    >> decrypt it.
    >>

    > I have no idea of current practices, but decades ago
    > when I was involved in en/decryption, it was customary
    > to store not the password, but the encrypted version of
    > the password using an encryption method which was one-way:
    > the encryption method was well-known, and the user (only)
    > new the plaintext password, but no-one (supposedly) could
    > reverse the encryption. A distressed user could only set
    > a new password after authenticating themselves, and again
    > it would not be stored, only its encrypted version to
    > compare when the user logged on and their attempt at the
    > password was encrypted, hopefully yielding something
    > identical to the stored encrypted version. I'd expect
    > any current password control method to be equally
    > robust.


    I am quite sure that is the current practice. But there could be
    exceptions, since not everyone pays attention to common sense...

    Actually, I was alluding to that when I said that "Nir is pretty
    clever". But I have to admit it would take more than cleverness to crack
    the password using the method you describe; unfortunately, I didn't
    think that deeply until your post :)

    One method of cracking a password is to go through a series of possible
    passwords, encrypting each by the known method, until the encrypted text
    matches what is stored on the computer. It would definitely take a while
    to crack a password on a mere home computer.

    For myself, an encrypted password data base, well backed up, gets around
    a lot of my memory problems.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Nov 28, 2012
    #16
  17. On 28/11/2012 11:38 AM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    > ...
    > One method of cracking a password is to go through a series of possible
    > passwords, encrypting each by the known method, until the encrypted text
    > matches what is stored on the computer. It would definitely take a while
    > to crack a password on a mere home computer.
    > ...
    >


    Um ... yes. And all an administrator has to do is limit
    the number of tries to, say, three before shutting down
    the attempt, with penalties of varying severity. ATMs
    either swallow your card (really severe) or shut down
    access until you go to your bank for a reset (almost as
    severe). If you tried that for access in a corporation,
    somebody's boss would come storming into your office,
    probably the next day, wanting to know if you were trying
    to shut the company down. Forcing an end to the attempt
    followed by a 30-second break would be more acceptable
    and would prevent any computer-generated attempt to try
    all possible passwords.

    By the way, comparing an encrypted attempt to an encrypted
    password allows a nice little side effect, of rejecting a
    password which is already in use, although you could have
    a lot of trouble explaining to the dense that you really
    don't have their password stored in plaintext somewhere.
    The passwords "in use" would of course include many of the
    really stupid ones like "PW" and "123456" and every word
    in the Oxford English Dictionary. Many other
    easily attacked ones can be excluded by insisting on a
    lower case alphabetic, an upper case alphabetic, a digit
    _and_ a special character (like "/" or the other stuff
    your device will accept) somewhere in the password.

    Oh yes, "a while" as you put it. A simple scheme like six
    lowercase alphabetics would require over 300 million
    tries, which at one a second if you're a demon typist
    or thumber would take something of the order of twelve
    years; but take heart, you'd have an even chance of
    success in the first six years. If my arithmetic is
    correct.
    Anthony Buckland, Dec 3, 2012
    #17
  18. On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:51:46 -0800, Anthony Buckland wrote:

    > On 28/11/2012 11:38 AM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >> ...
    >> One method of cracking a password is to go through a series of possible
    >> passwords, encrypting each by the known method, until the encrypted text
    >> matches what is stored on the computer. It would definitely take a while
    >> to crack a password on a mere home computer.
    >> ...
    >>

    >
    > Um ... yes. And all an administrator has to do is limit
    > the number of tries to, say, three before shutting down
    > the attempt, with penalties of varying severity.


    Notice that I said "the encrypted text matches what is stored on the
    computer", not "try to log in". It doesn't even need to be done on the
    computer holding the password; just copy the encrypted password to where
    you are running the algorithm.

    > ATMs
    > either swallow your card (really severe) or shut down
    > access until you go to your bank for a reset (almost as
    > severe). If you tried that for access in a corporation,
    > somebody's boss would come storming into your office,
    > probably the next day, wanting to know if you were trying
    > to shut the company down. Forcing an end to the attempt
    > followed by a 30-second break would be more acceptable
    > and would prevent any computer-generated attempt to try
    > all possible passwords.
    >
    > By the way, comparing an encrypted attempt to an encrypted
    > password allows a nice little side effect, of rejecting a
    > password which is already in use, although you could have
    > a lot of trouble explaining to the dense that you really
    > don't have their password stored in plaintext somewhere.
    > The passwords "in use" would of course include many of the
    > really stupid ones like "PW" and "123456" and every word
    > in the Oxford English Dictionary. Many other
    > easily attacked ones can be excluded by insisting on a
    > lower case alphabetic, an upper case alphabetic, a digit
    > _and_ a special character (like "/" or the other stuff
    > your device will accept) somewhere in the password.
    >
    > Oh yes, "a while" as you put it. A simple scheme like six
    > lowercase alphabetics would require over 300 million
    > tries, which at one a second if you're a demon typist
    > or thumber would take something of the order of twelve
    > years; but take heart, you'd have an even chance of
    > success in the first six years. If my arithmetic is
    > correct.


    But I didn't suggest typing it in[1]. To use the method I described, one
    would run a password generator program which would generate all possible
    passwords and automatically compare the results to the aforementioned
    encrypted key. This could speed up the operation by a factor of 10
    (using 10 without an exponent a good bit bigger than 1 is meant as a
    joke).

    [1] I said "go through a series of ... passwords", which is admittedly
    vague, but I *did* think the intention was obvious, especially in
    conjunction with the proviso that "the encrypted text matches what is
    stored".

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Dec 3, 2012
    #18
  19. On 03/12/2012 3:47 PM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    > On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:51:46 -0800, Anthony Buckland wrote:
    >
    >> On 28/11/2012 11:38 AM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >>> ...
    >>> One method of cracking a password is to go through a series of possible
    >>> passwords, encrypting each by the known method, until the encrypted text
    >>> matches what is stored on the computer. It would definitely take a while
    >>> to crack a password on a mere home computer.
    >>> ...
    >>>

    >>
    >> Um ... yes. And all an administrator has to do is limit
    >> the number of tries to, say, three before shutting down
    >> the attempt, with penalties of varying severity.

    >
    > Notice that I said "the encrypted text matches what is stored on the
    > computer", not "try to log in". It doesn't even need to be done on the
    > computer holding the password; just copy the encrypted password to where
    > you are running the algorithm.

    ....

    OK, I get your point. Now, how does the cracker get
    access to the collection of encrypted passwords?
    The original question concerned a router. The
    encrypted passwords are presumably on a computer
    at the installation granting access to the network,
    which I admit could be close by, in the IT office
    administering the LAN, or could on the other hand be
    a telephone company building in some city in the same
    country. In the first case, Sandra Bullock triggers
    a fire alarm, squirms into the appropriate cubicle,
    and copies the file onto a DVD, getting away just in
    time when everyone comes back from the false alarm.
    In the second case, more difficult.

    Anyway, this is really all a digression from the
    original problem, which was solvable simply by
    resetting the router to default values, which
    fortunately included the plaintext password, no
    encryption problem at all.
    Anthony Buckland, Dec 5, 2012
    #19
  20. On Wed, 05 Dec 2012 13:14:14 -0800, Anthony Buckland wrote:

    > On 03/12/2012 3:47 PM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >> On Mon, 03 Dec 2012 14:51:46 -0800, Anthony Buckland wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 28/11/2012 11:38 AM, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >>>> ...
    >>>> One method of cracking a password is to go through a series of possible
    >>>> passwords, encrypting each by the known method, until the encrypted text
    >>>> matches what is stored on the computer. It would definitely take a while
    >>>> to crack a password on a mere home computer.
    >>>> ...
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Um ... yes. And all an administrator has to do is limit
    >>> the number of tries to, say, three before shutting down
    >>> the attempt, with penalties of varying severity.

    >>
    >> Notice that I said "the encrypted text matches what is stored on the
    >> computer", not "try to log in". It doesn't even need to be done on the
    >> computer holding the password; just copy the encrypted password to where
    >> you are running the algorithm.

    > ...
    >
    > OK, I get your point. Now, how does the cracker get
    > access to the collection of encrypted passwords?


    In the old Unix days, the file containing those things was accessible to
    at least root (it's been too long for me to recall whether it was
    available to others).

    For things like Windows, in all honesty I don't know, but if I were a
    thief, I'd try to find out :)

    > The original question concerned a router. The
    > encrypted passwords are presumably on a computer
    > at the installation granting access to the network,
    > which I admit could be close by, in the IT office
    > administering the LAN, or could on the other hand be
    > a telephone company building in some city in the same
    > country. In the first case, Sandra Bullock triggers
    > a fire alarm, squirms into the appropriate cubicle,
    > and copies the file onto a DVD, getting away just in
    > time when everyone comes back from the false alarm.
    > In the second case, more difficult.


    How do I get access to Sandra Bullock? I only ask because my partner is
    not looking over my shoulder at the moment...

    > Anyway, this is really all a digression from the
    > original problem, which was solvable simply by
    > resetting the router to default values, which
    > fortunately included the plaintext password, no
    > encryption problem at all.


    True.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Dec 5, 2012
    #20
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