Windows 7 disk defragmentation.

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Peter Jason, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.

    Which is right?

    P
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 3, 2011
    #1
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  2. Peter Jason

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Fri, 04 Mar 2011 08:07:28 +1100, Peter Jason <> wrote:

    >The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    >not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.
    >
    >Which is right?


    Both are right. There is no single way to optimize a hard drive
    volume, so each program has it's own algorithm. The result is that
    each program has its own opinion of the state of the drive.

    --

    Char Jackson
     
    Char Jackson, Mar 3, 2011
    #2
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  3. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 16:40:09 -0500, Paul <> wrote:

    >Peter Jason wrote:
    >> The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    >> not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.
    >>
    >> Which is right?
    >>
    >> P

    >
    >Windows 7 does not defragment large files. The cutoff point is around
    >50MB or so. If you had a 5GB movie file, with 1000 fragments,
    >the Windows 7 defragmenter won't touch it. Third party defragmentation
    >tools, will probably defrag everything for you.
    >
    >Previous Windows OSes, like WinXP and Win2K, will attempt to defragment
    >everything as well. The Windows 7 one is "lightweight", and only
    >defragments the things that matter. The Windows 7 defragmenter will
    >be "finished", and a third party tool will show there is still work
    >to do. Like fixing up that 5GB movie file.
    >
    >I'd say the readout on any third party tool, is probably right.
    >
    > Paul


    Thanks; I do have many 5Gb movies.
    P
     
    Peter Jason, Mar 4, 2011
    #3
  4. Peter Jason

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Fri, 04 Mar 2011 11:03:42 +1100, Peter Jason <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 03 Mar 2011 16:40:09 -0500, Paul <> wrote:
    >
    >>Peter Jason wrote:
    >>> The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    >>> not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.
    >>>
    >>> Which is right?
    >>>
    >>> P

    >>
    >>Windows 7 does not defragment large files. The cutoff point is around
    >>50MB or so. If you had a 5GB movie file, with 1000 fragments,
    >>the Windows 7 defragmenter won't touch it. Third party defragmentation
    >>tools, will probably defrag everything for you.
    >>
    >>Previous Windows OSes, like WinXP and Win2K, will attempt to defragment
    >>everything as well. The Windows 7 one is "lightweight", and only
    >>defragments the things that matter. The Windows 7 defragmenter will
    >>be "finished", and a third party tool will show there is still work
    >>to do. Like fixing up that 5GB movie file.
    >>
    >>I'd say the readout on any third party tool, is probably right.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    >Thanks; I do have many 5Gb movies.
    >P


    Note that large video files are generally not affected by
    fragmentation. All video players use read-ahead buffers, making file
    access time a non-issue in almost all cases. I would even go as far as
    saying defragmenting a Windows 7 system is almost entirely unnecessary
    as the performance improvement will be below noticeable levels.

    --

    Char Jackson
     
    Char Jackson, Mar 4, 2011
    #4
  5. Peter Jason

    Gordon Guest

    On 04/03/11 13:14, LSMFT wrote:

    >
    > I like fragmentation. It exercises my hard drive. Are there any programs
    > to increase fragmentation?
    >


    ROTFLMAO!
     
    Gordon, Mar 4, 2011
    #5
  6. "Char Jackson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 04 Mar 2011 08:07:28 +1100, Peter Jason <> wrote:
    >
    >>The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    >>not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.
    >>
    >>Which is right?

    >
    > Both are right. There is no single way to optimize a hard drive
    > volume, so each program has it's own algorithm. The result is that
    > each program has its own opinion of the state of the drive.


    The point actually is that there is no single way to define what is meant by
    a percentage fragmented.
    30% fragmented could mean many different things.

    At one extreme you could say what percentage of files are fragmented in any
    way.

    At the other you could say if you read right through every file what
    proportion of the time you advance from one allocation block to the next in
    the file are they not right next to each other on the disk.

    --

    Brian Gregory. (In the UK)

    To email me remove the letter vee.
     
    Brian Gregory [UK], Mar 4, 2011
    #6
  7. Peter Jason

    Paul Guest

    Brian Gregory [UK] wrote:
    > "Char Jackson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Fri, 04 Mar 2011 08:07:28 +1100, Peter Jason <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this does
    >>> not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%.
    >>>
    >>> Which is right?

    >> Both are right. There is no single way to optimize a hard drive
    >> volume, so each program has it's own algorithm. The result is that
    >> each program has its own opinion of the state of the drive.

    >
    > The point actually is that there is no single way to define what is meant by
    > a percentage fragmented.
    > 30% fragmented could mean many different things.
    >
    > At one extreme you could say what percentage of files are fragmented in any
    > way.
    >
    > At the other you could say if you read right through every file what
    > proportion of the time you advance from one allocation block to the next in
    > the file are they not right next to each other on the disk.
    >


    The Sysinternals program "Contig", can scan the entire disk and
    tell you whether each file consists of one contiguous chunk, or
    is fragmented. The program also allows individual files to be
    defragmented. Unlike the WinXP defragmenter, which I noticed "pushes
    files to the left", the "Contig" program simply finds blocks of
    storage space which are continguous, and transfers the file there
    (using the Windows defrag API provided for that purpose, so it's safe).
    That means files are left floating somewhere in the right hand portion
    of a defragmentation display. But the file is still technically
    defragmented - it hasn't been subject to any "relocation policy" at
    the same time. It's the closest thing to "pure defragmentation",
    rather than combining defragmentation and file location optimization
    that other tools provide.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897428

    contig -v -a -s C:\ > filelist.txt

    ("Failed to open C:\\hiberfil.sys: Access is denied.")

    In fact, I also found the Contig program useful, just for the purpose
    of making a file list for an entire partition. It's pretty fast, as
    scanners go.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Mar 5, 2011
    #7
  8. Peter Jason

    DragonDon Guest

    Alias <> wrote in news:4d70e6f1$-
    privat.org:

    >>
    >> I like fragmentation. It exercises my hard drive. Are there any programs
    >> to increase fragmentation?
    >>

    >
    > Sure, uninstall and install MS Office twenty times or more.
    >


    SETI? :)

    --
    http://dragondon.net
    "My little corner of the Interwebs"
     
    DragonDon, Mar 5, 2011
    #8
  9. Peter Jason

    flyingsabre Guest

    Peter Jason wrote on 03/03/2011 16:07 ET
    > The windows 7 defrag facility shows 0% defragmentation, but this doe
    > not agree with the Piriform Defragger which shows 30%
    >
    > Which is right
    >
    >
    >

    The in-built aint too great, especially if you use your computer a lot. I
    fac
    it may even damage it. I've been defragging years! I'd say Diskeeper has th
    best defragmentation technologies.
     
    flyingsabre, Mar 9, 2011
    #9
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