USB 3

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by James Silverton, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    presently have any devices that use them.
    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 1, 2011
    #1
  2. "James Silverton" <> wrote in message
    news:ikjdah$q65$-september.org...
    > Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my
    > machine is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3
    > but I don't presently have any devices that use them.


    The USB3 socket is somewhat different looking than a USB2 socket.
    Easiest to show a picture rather than describe it, so go here:

    http://www.usb3.com/usb3-info.html

    HTH

    --
    Zaphod

    "The best Bang since the Big One" - Eccentrica Gallumbits
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Mar 1, 2011
    #2
  3. On 3/1/2011 1:56 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > "James Silverton"<> wrote in message
    > news:ikjdah$q65$-september.org...
    >> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my
    >> machine is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3
    >> but I don't presently have any devices that use them.

    >
    > The USB3 socket is somewhat different looking than a USB2 socket.
    > Easiest to show a picture rather than describe it, so go here:
    >
    > http://www.usb3.com/usb3-info.html
    >
    > HTH
    >

    Thank you very much indeed! That is very interesting information. Is
    there any way to electrically detect the difference? I'm afraid my
    close-up vision is not very good. I guess I could open up the case and
    check inside or go to the store where I bought the computer. I did try
    asking over the phone but there was a bit of a language difficulty.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 1, 2011
    #3
  4. James Silverton

    John Aldred Guest

    James Silverton wrote:

    > Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    > is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    > presently have any devices that use them.


    The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light and a
    pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements on
    the sockets at the back of my computer.

    Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?

    However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager identifies any
    of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3, but it may
    tell you if you have any.

    --
    John
    John Aldred, Mar 1, 2011
    #4
  5. "James Silverton" <> wrote in message
    news:ikjiqf$d6a$-september.org...
    > On 3/1/2011 1:56 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    >> "James Silverton"<> wrote in message
    >> news:ikjdah$q65$-september.org...
    >>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my
    >>> machine is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3
    >>> but I don't presently have any devices that use them.

    >>
    >> The USB3 socket is somewhat different looking than a USB2 socket.
    >> Easiest to show a picture rather than describe it, so go here:
    >>
    >> http://www.usb3.com/usb3-info.html
    >>
    >> HTH
    >>

    > Thank you very much indeed! That is very interesting information. Is
    > there any way to electrically detect the difference? I'm afraid my
    > close-up vision is not very good. I guess I could open up the case
    > and check inside or go to the store where I bought the computer. I
    > did try asking over the phone but there was a bit of a language
    > difficulty.
    >


    The USB2 portion of the socket is likely electrically identical to a
    standard USB2 since USB3 was designed to be backward compatible with
    USB2. If I needed to easily identify a plug as USB3, I'd be inclined
    to grab a USB3 cable and see if it fits or not.

    --
    Zaphod

    Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, ya know? - Gag Halfrunt
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Mar 1, 2011
    #5
  6. On 3/1/2011 3:08 PM, John Aldred wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    >
    >> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >> presently have any devices that use them.

    >
    > The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    > However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light and a
    > pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements on
    > the sockets at the back of my computer.
    >
    > Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?
    >
    > However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager identifies any
    > of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3, but it may
    > tell you if you have any.
    >

    Under "Universal Serial Bus controllers"" there are
    two Generic USB hubs,
    two Intel 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host
    Controllers,
    one USB Composite Device,
    one USB Mass Storage Device,
    one USB Printing Support
    two USB Root Hubs

    That does not tell *me* too much :-(

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 1, 2011
    #6
  7. James Silverton

    John Aldred Guest

    James Silverton wrote:

    > On 3/1/2011 3:08 PM, John Aldred wrote:
    >> James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>> presently have any devices that use them.

    >>
    >> The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    >> However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light and a
    >> pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements
    >> on the sockets at the back of my computer.
    >>
    >> Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?
    >>
    >> However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager identifies
    >> any of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3, but it
    >> may tell you if you have any.
    >>

    > Under "Universal Serial Bus controllers"" there are
    > two Generic USB hubs,
    > two Intel 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host
    > Controllers,
    > one USB Composite Device,
    > one USB Mass Storage Device,
    > one USB Printing Support
    > two USB Root Hubs
    >
    > That does not tell *me* too much :-(


    It doesn't tell me much either.
    On my machine Device manager lists
    NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Root Hub.

    However I cheated, by fitting a PCIe USB 3 card!
    Just wondered if a built in USB 3 hub would be identified as such.

    Well I guess the only way is to get a flashlight and a magnifying glass, as
    I just did, and compare the appearance of the USB socket on your computer
    with the images posted by Zaphod.

    --
    John
    John Aldred, Mar 1, 2011
    #7
  8. James Silverton

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    <> wrote:

    >Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >presently have any devices that use them.


    Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.

    If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    the rest of the information you're looking for.

    --

    Char Jackson
    Char Jackson, Mar 2, 2011
    #8
  9. On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    > On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >> presently have any devices that use them.

    >
    > Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    > check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    > will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >
    > If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    > will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    > open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    > the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >

    Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2011
    #9
  10. James Silverton

    Paul Guest

    John Aldred wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    >
    >> On 3/1/2011 3:08 PM, John Aldred wrote:
    >>> James Silverton wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>> The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    >>> However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light and a
    >>> pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements
    >>> on the sockets at the back of my computer.
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?
    >>>
    >>> However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager identifies
    >>> any of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3, but it
    >>> may tell you if you have any.
    >>>

    >> Under "Universal Serial Bus controllers"" there are
    >> two Generic USB hubs,
    >> two Intel 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host
    >> Controllers,
    >> one USB Composite Device,
    >> one USB Mass Storage Device,
    >> one USB Printing Support
    >> two USB Root Hubs
    >>
    >> That does not tell *me* too much :-(

    >
    > It doesn't tell me much either.
    > On my machine Device manager lists
    > NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Root Hub.
    >
    > However I cheated, by fitting a PCIe USB 3 card!
    > Just wondered if a built in USB 3 hub would be identified as such.
    >
    > Well I guess the only way is to get a flashlight and a magnifying glass, as
    > I just did, and compare the appearance of the USB socket on your computer
    > with the images posted by Zaphod.
    >


    As far as I know, that NEC chip is still the only game in town.

    http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/18/nec-japan-announces-its-superspeed-usb-3-0-controller/

    Intel hasn't delivered USB3 on a chipset yet (choosing to go with
    it's Thunderballs/LightPork technology instead, to confuse the market).
    I don't think AMD has done one either (but there may have been an
    announcement that AMD was buying an IP logic block from someone).
    Maybe AMD will deliver this year some time ?

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4194/intels-codename-lightpeak-launches-as-thunderbolt

    There is an example of Device Manager with a NEC chip for USB3, here.
    So this is what you might look for, as of today. I can't predict
    what future ones will use for labeling.

    http://www.legitreviews.com/images/reviews/1277/device_manager1.jpg

    *******

    Caveats on the NEC chip. It has a PCI Express x1 lane interface on it.
    The interface runs at Rev.2 or Rev.1 speeds. If you plug it into a
    Rev.1 slot, then the theoretical speed is reduced from the maximum
    values you might see listed. There is currently only one
    hardware peripheral device right now, that cares about this.
    For connecting an external USB3 hard drive, it's not important.

    The first motherboards to have predominantly Rev.2 interfaces, are the
    Intel Sandy Bridge motherboards (LGA1155). With many older boards, you
    have to do careful analysis, to determine your slot type, and whether
    that NEC USB3 card you bought, ends up at full speed.

    There are other tricks for getting full speed performance from older
    PCI Express slots. Asus used a PCI Express bridge chip, to do "gear
    changing" and get the faster communications path needed. Asus uses
    an x4 Rev.1 add-in card, to develop x1 Rev.2 lanes for the chips
    soldered to the card. This card was an excellent deal, while it
    was available. You'd need a spare x4, x8, or x16 slot to use it.

    Asus U3S6 card - was about $25 or so.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813995004

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 2, 2011
    #10
  11. James Silverton

    Rob Guest

    On 01/03/2011 21:01, John Aldred wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    >
    >> On 3/1/2011 3:08 PM, John Aldred wrote:
    >>> James Silverton wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>
    >>> The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    >>> However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light and a
    >>> pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements
    >>> on the sockets at the back of my computer.
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?
    >>>
    >>> However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager identifies
    >>> any of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3, but it
    >>> may tell you if you have any.
    >>>

    >> Under "Universal Serial Bus controllers"" there are
    >> two Generic USB hubs,
    >> two Intel 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host
    >> Controllers,
    >> one USB Composite Device,
    >> one USB Mass Storage Device,
    >> one USB Printing Support
    >> two USB Root Hubs
    >>
    >> That does not tell *me* too much :-(

    >
    > It doesn't tell me much either.
    > On my machine Device manager lists
    > NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Root Hub.
    >
    > However I cheated, by fitting a PCIe USB 3 card!
    > Just wondered if a built in USB 3 hub would be identified as such.
    >
    > Well I guess the only way is to get a flashlight and a magnifying glass, as
    > I just did, and compare the appearance of the USB socket on your computer
    > with the images posted by Zaphod.
    >


    The Intel 5 series/3400 USB controllers are USB 2.0
    HTH
    --
    Rob
    Rob, Mar 2, 2011
    #11
  12. On 3/2/2011 10:57 AM, Paul wrote:
    > John Aldred wrote:
    >> James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 3/1/2011 3:08 PM, John Aldred wrote:
    >>>> James Silverton wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>> The illustration and information that Zaphod posted is very useful.
    >>>> However, with my eyesight, I found myself in need of a bright light
    >>>> and a
    >>>> pair of reading glasses to identify the differences in pin arrangements
    >>>> on the sockets at the back of my computer.
    >>>>
    >>>> Perhaps the blue colour of the insulator is the best clue?
    >>>>
    >>>> However the reason for this reply is to ask if Device Manager
    >>>> identifies
    >>>> any of the ports as USB 3. It won't tell you which ones are USB 3,
    >>>> but it
    >>>> may tell you if you have any.
    >>>>
    >>> Under "Universal Serial Bus controllers"" there are
    >>> two Generic USB hubs,
    >>> two Intel 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host
    >>> Controllers,
    >>> one USB Composite Device,
    >>> one USB Mass Storage Device,
    >>> one USB Printing Support
    >>> two USB Root Hubs
    >>>
    >>> That does not tell *me* too much :-(

    >>
    >> It doesn't tell me much either.
    >> On my machine Device manager lists
    >> NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Root Hub.
    >>
    >> However I cheated, by fitting a PCIe USB 3 card!
    >> Just wondered if a built in USB 3 hub would be identified as such.
    >>
    >> Well I guess the only way is to get a flashlight and a magnifying
    >> glass, as I just did, and compare the appearance of the USB socket on
    >> your computer with the images posted by Zaphod.
    >>

    >
    > As far as I know, that NEC chip is still the only game in town.
    >
    > http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/18/nec-japan-announces-its-superspeed-usb-3-0-controller/
    >
    >
    > Intel hasn't delivered USB3 on a chipset yet (choosing to go with
    > it's Thunderballs/LightPork technology instead, to confuse the market).
    > I don't think AMD has done one either (but there may have been an
    > announcement that AMD was buying an IP logic block from someone).
    > Maybe AMD will deliver this year some time ?
    >
    > http://www.anandtech.com/show/4194/intels-codename-lightpeak-launches-as-thunderbolt
    >
    >
    > There is an example of Device Manager with a NEC chip for USB3, here.
    > So this is what you might look for, as of today. I can't predict
    > what future ones will use for labeling.
    >
    > http://www.legitreviews.com/images/reviews/1277/device_manager1.jpg
    >
    > *******
    >
    > Caveats on the NEC chip. It has a PCI Express x1 lane interface on it.
    > The interface runs at Rev.2 or Rev.1 speeds. If you plug it into a
    > Rev.1 slot, then the theoretical speed is reduced from the maximum
    > values you might see listed. There is currently only one
    > hardware peripheral device right now, that cares about this.
    > For connecting an external USB3 hard drive, it's not important.
    >
    > The first motherboards to have predominantly Rev.2 interfaces, are the
    > Intel Sandy Bridge motherboards (LGA1155). With many older boards, you
    > have to do careful analysis, to determine your slot type, and whether
    > that NEC USB3 card you bought, ends up at full speed.
    >
    > There are other tricks for getting full speed performance from older
    > PCI Express slots. Asus used a PCI Express bridge chip, to do "gear
    > changing" and get the faster communications path needed. Asus uses
    > an x4 Rev.1 add-in card, to develop x1 Rev.2 lanes for the chips
    > soldered to the card. This card was an excellent deal, while it
    > was available. You'd need a spare x4, x8, or x16 slot to use it.
    >
    > Asus U3S6 card - was about $25 or so.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813995004
    >

    Note that the Intel "Sandy Bridge" motherboard has serious bugs that are
    not expectedto be fixed in shipped motherboards until the end of this
    month. I was going to buy a machine with the new motherboard last month
    but I had to give up on it.


    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2011
    #12
  13. James Silverton

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    <> wrote:

    >On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>> presently have any devices that use them.

    >>
    >> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    >> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>
    >> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    >> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    >> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    >> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>

    >Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3


    I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    like that.

    --

    Char Jackson
    Char Jackson, Mar 2, 2011
    #13
  14. James Silverton

    John Aldred Guest

    Paul wrote:

    [Snip]
    >
    > As far as I know, that NEC chip is still the only game in town.
    >
    > http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/18/nec-japan-announces-its-superspeed-

    usb-3-0-controller/
    >
    > Intel hasn't delivered USB3 on a chipset yet (choosing to go with
    > it's Thunderballs/LightPork technology instead, to confuse the market).
    > I don't think AMD has done one either (but there may have been an
    > announcement that AMD was buying an IP logic block from someone).
    > Maybe AMD will deliver this year some time ?


    I guess that explains why I couldn't find anything about USB 3 on the Intel
    website.

    >
    > http://www.anandtech.com/show/4194/intels-codename-lightpeak-launches-as-

    thunderbolt
    >
    > There is an example of Device Manager with a NEC chip for USB3, here.
    > So this is what you might look for, as of today. I can't predict
    > what future ones will use for labeling.
    >
    > http://www.legitreviews.com/images/reviews/1277/device_manager1.jpg


    Yes my Device Manager has the same two lines that start with NEC.

    > *******
    >
    > Caveats on the NEC chip. It has a PCI Express x1 lane interface on it.
    > The interface runs at Rev.2 or Rev.1 speeds. If you plug it into a
    > Rev.1 slot, then the theoretical speed is reduced from the maximum
    > values you might see listed. There is currently only one
    > hardware peripheral device right now, that cares about this.
    > For connecting an external USB3 hard drive, it's not important.
    >
    > The first motherboards to have predominantly Rev.2 interfaces, are the
    > Intel Sandy Bridge motherboards (LGA1155). With many older boards, you
    > have to do careful analysis, to determine your slot type, and whether
    > that NEC USB3 card you bought, ends up at full speed.
    >
    > There are other tricks for getting full speed performance from older
    > PCI Express slots. Asus used a PCI Express bridge chip, to do "gear
    > changing" and get the faster communications path needed. Asus uses
    > an x4 Rev.1 add-in card, to develop x1 Rev.2 lanes for the chips
    > soldered to the card. This card was an excellent deal, while it
    > was available. You'd need a spare x4, x8, or x16 slot to use it.
    >
    > Asus U3S6 card - was about $25 or so.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813995004
    >


    Thanks for the info.

    --
    John
    John Aldred, Mar 2, 2011
    #14
  15. On 3/2/2011 12:08 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    > On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>
    >>> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    >>> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >>> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>>
    >>> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    >>> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    >>> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    >>> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>>

    >> Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3

    >
    > I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    > model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    > should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    > like that.
    >

    I'll probably be able to talk to the tech who sold me the machine tomorrow.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2011
    #15
  16. James Silverton

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 15:28:21 -0500, James Silverton
    <> wrote:

    >On 3/2/2011 12:08 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>>
    >>>> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    >>>> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >>>> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    >>>> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    >>>> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    >>>> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>>>
    >>> Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3

    >>
    >> I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    >> model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    >> should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    >> like that.
    >>

    >I'll probably be able to talk to the tech who sold me the machine tomorrow.


    So Belarc didn't give you the mobo info? That's strange. When I build
    systems for customers, I always include a Belarc profile so they can
    see what's inside.

    --

    Char Jackson
    Char Jackson, Mar 2, 2011
    #16
  17. On 3/2/2011 3:56 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    > On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 15:28:21 -0500, James Silverton
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 3/2/2011 12:08 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>>> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my machine
    >>>>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I don't
    >>>>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you can
    >>>>> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >>>>> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities that
    >>>>> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you to
    >>>>> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    >>>>> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3
    >>>
    >>> I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    >>> model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    >>> should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    >>> like that.
    >>>

    >> I'll probably be able to talk to the tech who sold me the machine tomorrow.

    >
    > So Belarc didn't give you the mobo info? That's strange. When I build
    > systems for customers, I always include a Belarc profile so they can
    > see what's inside.
    >

    It gave me an amazing amount of useful information about the processor,
    the main circuit board, the drives and memory etc! However, there was no
    indication of whether the USB hubs were types 2 or 3.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2011
    #17
  18. James Silverton

    KCB Guest

    "James Silverton" <> wrote in message
    news:ikme0h$j9s$-september.org...
    > On 3/2/2011 3:56 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 15:28:21 -0500, James Silverton
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 3/2/2011 12:08 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>>>> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my
    >>>>>>> machine
    >>>>>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I
    >>>>>>> don't
    >>>>>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned, you
    >>>>>> can
    >>>>>> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >>>>>> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities
    >>>>>> that
    >>>>>> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring you
    >>>>>> to
    >>>>>> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to find
    >>>>>> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3
    >>>>
    >>>> I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    >>>> model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    >>>> should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    >>>> like that.
    >>>>
    >>> I'll probably be able to talk to the tech who sold me the machine
    >>> tomorrow.

    >>
    >> So Belarc didn't give you the mobo info? That's strange. When I build
    >> systems for customers, I always include a Belarc profile so they can
    >> see what's inside.
    >>

    > It gave me an amazing amount of useful information about the processor,
    > the main circuit board, the drives and memory etc! However, there was no
    > indication of whether the USB hubs were types 2 or 3.
    >


    (1)Use Belarc to FIND YOUR MOTHERBOARD MODEL NUMBER.

    (2)Go to the manufacturer's web site to download the manual and/or look at
    the specifications to see if/which ports are USB 3.

    If you don't know who made the motherboard, even after using Belarc, then
    Google the model number to find out, go back to step (2).
    KCB, Mar 2, 2011
    #18
  19. On 3/2/2011 4:58 PM, KCB wrote:
    >
    > "James Silverton" <> wrote in message
    > news:ikme0h$j9s$-september.org...
    >> On 3/2/2011 3:56 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 15:28:21 -0500, James Silverton
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 3/2/2011 12:08 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>>> On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:13:16 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 3/1/2011 10:40 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
    >>>>>>> On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:19:03 -0500, James Silverton
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Can anyone tell me how to determine whether a USB socket on my
    >>>>>>>> machine
    >>>>>>>> is type 2 or type 3? I believe two of the sockets are USB3 but I
    >>>>>>>> don't
    >>>>>>>> presently have any devices that use them.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Besides the physical inspection that's already been mentioned,
    >>>>>>> you can
    >>>>>>> check the specs for your computer or motherboard. USB3, being new,
    >>>>>>> will almost certainly be mentioned somewhere.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> If you don't know which motherboard you have, there are utilities
    >>>>>>> that
    >>>>>>> will tell you, such as Belarc Advisor (free), without requiring
    >>>>>>> you to
    >>>>>>> open the case. Armed with that information, it's usually easy to
    >>>>>>> find
    >>>>>>> the rest of the information you're looking for.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> Belarc seemed to work well but there was no mention of USB 2 or USB 3
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I was expecting Belarc to give you the motherboard manufacturer and
    >>>>> model. (It does that on each of my systems here.) From there, you
    >>>>> should be able to find a data sheet, manual, spec sheet, something
    >>>>> like that.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I'll probably be able to talk to the tech who sold me the machine
    >>>> tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> So Belarc didn't give you the mobo info? That's strange. When I build
    >>> systems for customers, I always include a Belarc profile so they can
    >>> see what's inside.
    >>>

    >> It gave me an amazing amount of useful information about the
    >> processor, the main circuit board, the drives and memory etc! However,
    >> there was no indication of whether the USB hubs were types 2 or 3.
    >>

    >
    > (1)Use Belarc to FIND YOUR MOTHERBOARD MODEL NUMBER.
    >
    > (2)Go to the manufacturer's web site to download the manual and/or look
    > at the specifications to see if/which ports are USB 3.
    >
    > If you don't know who made the motherboard, even after using Belarc,
    > then Google the model number to find out, go back to step (2).


    I'll ask the tech tomorrow if I have the time :)

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"
    James Silverton, Mar 2, 2011
    #19
  20. James Silverton

    Larry Guest


    >
    > I'll ask the tech tomorrow if I have the time :)
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > James Silverton, Potomac
    >
    > "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"


    This site will tell you what you want to know.

    http://www.usb3.com/usb3-info.html

    Larry
    Larry, Mar 2, 2011
    #20

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.

Share This Page