Pentium 4 Vs. Pentium D

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Artreid, Jun 14, 2011.

  1. Artreid

    Artreid Guest

    Can I upgrade P4 processor to a Pentium D Processor
    Machine is DELL OPTIPLEX 170L currently running P4 2.8. I'd like to upgrade
    it to a Pentium D 3.4.
     
    Artreid, Jun 14, 2011
    #1
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  2. >Can I upgrade P4 processor to a Pentium D Processor
    >Machine is DELL OPTIPLEX 170L currently running P4 2.8. I'd like to upgrade
    >it to a Pentium D 3.4.


    This is not the pace to ask CPU upgrade questions. Do some research on
    Google. Also:
    http://www.dell.com/downloads/us/products/optix/170L_spec.pdf

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
     
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Jun 14, 2011
    #2
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  3. Artreid

    sctvguy1 Guest

    On Tue, 14 Jun 2011 10:08:27 -0400, Artreid wrote:

    > Can I upgrade P4 processor to a Pentium D Processor Machine is DELL
    > OPTIPLEX 170L currently running P4 2.8. I'd like to upgrade it to a
    > Pentium D 3.4.


    You can if the socket is a 775. I have a P4/3.0 and I can upgrade to the
    P4/D with dual cores.
     
    sctvguy1, Jun 14, 2011
    #3
  4. Artreid

    Paul Guest

    Artreid wrote:
    > Can I upgrade P4 processor to a Pentium D Processor
    > Machine is DELL OPTIPLEX 170L currently running P4 2.8. I'd like to
    > upgrade it to a Pentium D 3.4.


    Some Dell computers, use a different cooling assembly when
    a more powerful processor is used. That helps prevent
    overheating.

    Just because the CPU socket type (S478, LGA775 or whatever)
    happens to match, doesn't mean the computer has been
    engineered to take it. The BIOS could be incompatible,
    the Vcore regulator may not have enough power to run
    it, the processor could use a config pin to signal
    the level of compatibility (which is why some Prescott
    processors won't work in older motherboards). There
    are a bunch of things that can go wrong.

    As "Thee Chicago Wolf" points out, Google can help you.
    The experiences of a previous experimenter, are the
    best proof an upgrade can work. (If Dell would list
    all the compatible upgrades, an experiment would
    not be necessary.)

    *******

    If I look on Ebay, the 170L uses an S478 motherboard
    (S478 means a zero insertion force CPU socket with
    478 pin holes on it). The power converter is only
    three phase. This is not looking good... It doesn't
    even have an expansion slot for an AGP video card.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Dell-U2575-...491744484?pt=Motherboards&hash=item56430760e4

    If I look up a Pentium D 3.4GHz on cpu-world, it is
    LGA775 so won't fit your S478 motherboard socket.

    http://www.cpu-world.com/sspec/QP/QPUT.html

    *******

    You can start here, to look for processors

    http://ark.intel.com/ProductCollection.aspx?familyId=581

    Click the "Show spec, stepping, ordering, and socket details"
    button. Look for "478" socket processors.

    The best reasonable choice, is one like this -

    "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K Cache, 800 MHz FSB"

    That would be a Northwood, and runs at 89W. You would
    look for SL793 for sale. Since it runs at 3.4GHz,
    and your current processor is 2.8GHz, the ratio
    is 1.21x and that really isn't going to improve
    things enough to waste money on it.

    Your current processor, might be similar to this -

    "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 2.80 GHz, 512K Cache, 800 MHz FSB"

    That one is rated as a 70W processor, and the 89W one
    is close enough, perhaps the Vcore regulator can
    withstand it.

    *******

    Your motherboard specs are here.

    http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/op170L/en/UG/specs.htm

    "Level 2 (L2) cache

    128-KB, 256-KB, 512-KB, or 1-MB (depending on your computer configuration)
    pipelined-burst, eight-way set associative, write-back SRAM"

    The only reason that line is important, is because it indicates
    the motherboard can use Prescott or Northwood S478. The Prescott
    supports 1 MB L2 cache, while Northwood uses 512KB L2. The
    reason I selected a Northwood upgrade for you (with 512KB cache),
    is because those processors run cooler. And chances are, the
    processor could use a similar family code as well, to the one
    you've got, which improves the odds the BIOS has microcode
    support.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 14, 2011
    #4
  5. Artreid

    Artreid Guest

    Thanks Paul,
    "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K Cache,
    800 MHz FSB" Sounds good to me if it will let me run Win7 a bit more
    efficiently...


    "Paul" wrote in message news:it80vr$diq$...

    Artreid wrote:
    > Can I upgrade P4 processor to a Pentium D Processor
    > Machine is DELL OPTIPLEX 170L currently running P4 2.8. I'd like to
    > upgrade it to a Pentium D 3.4.


    Some Dell computers, use a different cooling assembly when
    a more powerful processor is used. That helps prevent
    overheating.

    Just because the CPU socket type (S478, LGA775 or whatever)
    happens to match, doesn't mean the computer has been
    engineered to take it. The BIOS could be incompatible,
    the Vcore regulator may not have enough power to run
    it, the processor could use a config pin to signal
    the level of compatibility (which is why some Prescott
    processors won't work in older motherboards). There
    are a bunch of things that can go wrong.

    As "Thee Chicago Wolf" points out, Google can help you.
    The experiences of a previous experimenter, are the
    best proof an upgrade can work. (If Dell would list
    all the compatible upgrades, an experiment would
    not be necessary.)

    *******

    If I look on Ebay, the 170L uses an S478 motherboard
    (S478 means a zero insertion force CPU socket with
    478 pin holes on it). The power converter is only
    three phase. This is not looking good... It doesn't
    even have an expansion slot for an AGP video card.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/New-Dell-U2575-...491744484?pt=Motherboards&hash=item56430760e4

    If I look up a Pentium D 3.4GHz on cpu-world, it is
    LGA775 so won't fit your S478 motherboard socket.

    http://www.cpu-world.com/sspec/QP/QPUT.html

    *******

    You can start here, to look for processors

    http://ark.intel.com/ProductCollection.aspx?familyId=581

    Click the "Show spec, stepping, ordering, and socket details"
    button. Look for "478" socket processors.

    The best reasonable choice, is one like this -

    "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K
    Cache, 800 MHz FSB"

    That would be a Northwood, and runs at 89W. You would
    look for SL793 for sale. Since it runs at 3.4GHz,
    and your current processor is 2.8GHz, the ratio
    is 1.21x and that really isn't going to improve
    things enough to waste money on it.

    Your current processor, might be similar to this -

    "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 2.80 GHz, 512K
    Cache, 800 MHz FSB"

    That one is rated as a 70W processor, and the 89W one
    is close enough, perhaps the Vcore regulator can
    withstand it.

    *******

    Your motherboard specs are here.

    http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/op170L/en/UG/specs.htm

    "Level 2 (L2) cache

    128-KB, 256-KB, 512-KB, or 1-MB (depending on your computer
    configuration)
    pipelined-burst, eight-way set associative, write-back SRAM"

    The only reason that line is important, is because it indicates
    the motherboard can use Prescott or Northwood S478. The Prescott
    supports 1 MB L2 cache, while Northwood uses 512KB L2. The
    reason I selected a Northwood upgrade for you (with 512KB cache),
    is because those processors run cooler. And chances are, the
    processor could use a similar family code as well, to the one
    you've got, which improves the odds the BIOS has microcode
    support.

    Paul
     
    Artreid, Jun 15, 2011
    #5
  6. Artreid

    Paul Guest

    Artreid wrote:
    > Thanks Paul,
    > "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K
    > Cache, 800 MHz FSB" Sounds good to me if it will let me run Win7 a bit
    > more efficiently...
    >


    It's my best guess as to what might work, but it's only 20% faster.
    If the machine feels slow, it'll probably still be slow after the
    upgrade.

    You really need to find a forum that deals in Dell problems and
    upgrades, to get more information, as to what other issues might
    show up when you upgrade.

    Windows 7 likes RAM. My laptop has 3GB of RAM, and that seems to work
    pretty well.

    The disk on my laptop is slow, and if you use an SSD for the disk,
    that can speed up some aspects of Windows 7. The advantage of the
    SSD, isn't necessarily the transfer speed - it's the "zero seek time"
    that helps. With no magnetic head to move around, the SSD can visit
    more locations in the file system per second, than a magnetic disk could.
    (Before buying an SSD, make sure you have a spare SATA connector
    on the motherboard surface. Typically a thin red cable is plugged
    into a port like that on the motherboard. On your system, there
    may be two SATA vertical connectors, near the Southbridge.)

    http://lib.store.yahoo.net/lib/directron/miniitxopticalsatainlg.jpg

    My laptop has only a single core processor. The laptop works fine
    when no software services are installed. When I install the package
    for my webcam, and the webcam software runs even when no webcam is
    plugged in, that slows the machine down. I find, with a single core,
    there is no room for a lot of bloat installed on the machine. The
    machine operates smoothly with a single core (which is surprising),
    but the computer cannot take a lot of software services running
    on it. Then it starts to feel sluggish.

    Older machines may not have room for a lot of RAM. The problem in
    your case, is there are only two DIMM slots, which makes RAM
    expansion difficult. The datasheet for 865GV, claims 1GB DIMMs
    (16 chip ones) can be used, so the best you can do on memory is
    2x1GB for a total of 2GB of memory. Using a matched set of DIMMs,
    improves the graphics update performance of your integrated
    graphics. If the computer had an AGP graphics card slot,
    you could upgrade the graphics a bit, making it possible to
    run Windows Aero with some speed.

    http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.aspx?model=OptiPlex 170L Series&Cat=RAM

    You can also run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor, for more
    information about your situation.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/downloads/upgrade-advisor

    You meet the "processor GHz". If you had 2x512MB RAM installed,
    that would be barely enough to meet the stated requirement. And
    the graphics states DX9 with a WDDM 1.0 driver.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/system-requirements

    If I look here, the 865GV isn't in the list at the bottom of the page.
    Run the Upgrade Advisor, to understand the impact. Vista and Windows 7
    share a lot of architecture details, so Vista advice can predict
    how Windows 7 will do. Disabling Aero graphics effects isn't the
    end of the world, and who knows, maybe it'll make your user
    experience better :)

    "Graphics - Windows Vista support FAQ"
    http://www.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/CS-023606.htm#aero

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Artreid

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Tue, 14 Jun 2011 19:00:56 -0400, "Artreid" <>
    wrote:

    >"Paul" wrote in message news:it80vr$diq$...
    >
    >The best reasonable choice, is one like this -
    >
    > "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K
    >Cache, 800 MHz FSB"
    >
    >That would be a Northwood, and runs at 89W. You would
    >look for SL793 for sale. Since it runs at 3.4GHz,
    >and your current processor is 2.8GHz, the ratio
    >is 1.21x and that really isn't going to improve
    >things enough to waste money on it.
    >
    >Thanks Paul,
    >"Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K Cache,
    >800 MHz FSB" Sounds good to me if it will let me run Win7 a bit more
    >efficiently...


    I agree with Paul. The upgrade you're considering will be all but
    invisible to you. The performance increase will be so slight as to be
    unnoticeable, even if you're expressly watching for it.

    --

    Char Jackson
     
    Char Jackson, Jun 15, 2011
    #7
  8. Artreid

    Paul Guest

    Char Jackson wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Jun 2011 19:00:56 -0400, "Artreid" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Paul" wrote in message news:it80vr$diq$...
    >>
    >> The best reasonable choice, is one like this -
    >>
    >> "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K
    >> Cache, 800 MHz FSB"
    >>
    >> That would be a Northwood, and runs at 89W. You would
    >> look for SL793 for sale. Since it runs at 3.4GHz,
    >> and your current processor is 2.8GHz, the ratio
    >> is 1.21x and that really isn't going to improve
    >> things enough to waste money on it.
    >>
    >> Thanks Paul,
    >> "Intel Pentium 4 Processor supporting HT Technology 3.40 GHz, 512K Cache,
    >> 800 MHz FSB" Sounds good to me if it will let me run Win7 a bit more
    >> efficiently...

    >
    > I agree with Paul. The upgrade you're considering will be all but
    > invisible to you. The performance increase will be so slight as to be
    > unnoticeable, even if you're expressly watching for it.
    >


    There is one time, when such processor upgrades are noticeable. When
    you have a gaming machine, and a slight processor improvement (like
    the 20%) causes a game to stop stuttering, that is worth it. I experienced
    that on my P4 machine, before I stopped using it. But when it comes
    to improving how that new OS behaves, it just isn't enough. The
    Optiplex 170L will be as slow as my (single core) laptop. And
    that laptop works fine, until you start adding software to it.
    Once it's bloated, it's a write-off.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Jun 15, 2011
    #8
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