New Windows 7 PC can't see computers over router VPN link

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Ted, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. Ted

    Ted Guest

    I have just replaced my main XP computer with a Windows 7 64 computer.

    I have a Draytek Vigor2600 router with inbuilt VPN that connects to another similar
    router over the internet.

    Both local and remote computers are a mixture of XP, Vista machines, with some
    printers and other boxes.

    The local machines are all on 192.168.8.x subnet.
    The remote machines are all on 192.168.9.x subnet.

    With my old XP computer I could see all my local machines and all the remote
    machines. File and printer sharing, etc, worked fine and was reliable.

    With my new Window 7 64 computer I can only see my local machines, and not the
    remote ones.

    I can ping all the remote machines ok (those that I know the IP address of).

    I can make a connection to a particular remote machines using its IP number (as in
    \\192.168.9.xx\somefolder), but this assumes I know of the existence and IP number
    of the machine in advance (they do change).

    If I disable the W7 firewall some of the remote machines do appear sometimes, but
    usually disappear again quite soon.

    If this is a firewall blocking problem, how do I tell the firewall to allow it?
    Why, with the firewall disabled, to they disappear again?

    If it is not a firewall problem what else might it be?

    I have tried everything I can think of!

    Ted.
     
    Ted, Feb 4, 2010
    #1
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  2. Ted wrote:
    > I have just replaced my main XP computer with a Windows 7 64 computer.
    >
    > I have a Draytek Vigor2600 router with inbuilt VPN that connects to another similar
    > router over the internet.
    >
    > Both local and remote computers are a mixture of XP, Vista machines, with some
    > printers and other boxes.
    >
    > The local machines are all on 192.168.8.x subnet.
    > The remote machines are all on 192.168.9.x subnet.
    >
    > With my old XP computer I could see all my local machines and all the remote
    > machines. File and printer sharing, etc, worked fine and was reliable.
    >
    > With my new Window 7 64 computer I can only see my local machines, and not the
    > remote ones.
    >
    > I can ping all the remote machines ok (those that I know the IP address of).
    >
    > I can make a connection to a particular remote machines using its IP number (as in
    > \\192.168.9.xx\somefolder), but this assumes I know of the existence and IP number
    > of the machine in advance (they do change).
    >
    > If I disable the W7 firewall some of the remote machines do appear sometimes, but
    > usually disappear again quite soon.
    >
    > If this is a firewall blocking problem, how do I tell the firewall to allow it?
    > Why, with the firewall disabled, to they disappear again?
    >
    > If it is not a firewall problem what else might it be?
    >
    > I have tried everything I can think of!
    >
    > Ted.
    >


    What is the setting for your windows firewall on the w7 machine
    currently? (is it public or work or home)?

    --
    "Software is like sex, it's better when it's free."
    - Linus Torvalds

    DRM and unintended consequences:
    http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=435&tag=nl.e101
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 4, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ted

    Seth Guest

    "Ted" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have just replaced my main XP computer with a Windows 7 64 computer.
    >
    > I have a Draytek Vigor2600 router with inbuilt VPN that connects to
    > another similar
    > router over the internet.
    >
    > Both local and remote computers are a mixture of XP, Vista machines, with
    > some
    > printers and other boxes.
    >
    > The local machines are all on 192.168.8.x subnet.
    > The remote machines are all on 192.168.9.x subnet.
    >
    > With my old XP computer I could see all my local machines and all the
    > remote
    > machines. File and printer sharing, etc, worked fine and was reliable.
    >
    > With my new Window 7 64 computer I can only see my local machines, and not
    > the
    > remote ones.
    >
    > I can ping all the remote machines ok (those that I know the IP address
    > of).
    >
    > I can make a connection to a particular remote machines using its IP
    > number (as in
    > \\192.168.9.xx\somefolder), but this assumes I know of the existence and
    > IP number
    > of the machine in advance (they do change).
    >
    > If I disable the W7 firewall some of the remote machines do appear
    > sometimes, but
    > usually disappear again quite soon.
    >
    > If this is a firewall blocking problem, how do I tell the firewall to
    > allow it?
    > Why, with the firewall disabled, to they disappear again?
    >
    > If it is not a firewall problem what else might it be?
    >
    > I have tried everything I can think of!



    When you first brought the Win7 machine up on the network, you probably got
    a big popup asking if the network you were on was Home, Work or Public. Did
    you choose something other and Work?

    Go into the Network sharing center and if your profile is not set to Work,
    change it so it is.
     
    Seth, Feb 4, 2010
    #3
  4. Ted

    Ted Guest

    On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 13:51:56 -0500 Seth <> wrote:

    >
    > When you first brought the Win7 machine up on the network, you
    > probably got a big popup asking if the network you were on was Home,
    > Work or Public. Did you choose something other and Work?
    >
    > Go into the Network sharing center and if your profile is not set to
    > Work, change it so it is.


    It is set to "Work". I did try it as "Home" as well, but it made nom difference.

    Ted.
     
    Ted, Feb 4, 2010
    #4
  5. Ted wrote:
    > On Thu, 04 Feb 2010 12:25:41 -0600 The poster formerly known as 'The Poster
    > Formerly Known as Nina DiBoy' <> wrote:
    >
    >> What is the setting for your windows firewall on the w7 machine
    >> currently? (is it public or work or home)?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It is set to "Work". I did try it as "Home" as well, but it made nom difference.
    >
    >
    > Ted.
    >


    OK Ted, try this next. In Network sharing center, do you have network
    discovery and file and printer sharing turned on?

    --
    "Software is like sex, it's better when it's free."
    - Linus Torvalds

    DRM and unintended consequences:
    http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=435&tag=nl.e101
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 4, 2010
    #5
  6. "Ted" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have just replaced my main XP computer with a Windows 7 64 computer.
    >
    > I have a Draytek Vigor2600 router with inbuilt VPN that connects to
    > another similar
    > router over the internet.
    >
    > Both local and remote computers are a mixture of XP, Vista machines, with
    > some
    > printers and other boxes.
    >
    > The local machines are all on 192.168.8.x subnet.
    > The remote machines are all on 192.168.9.x subnet.
    >
    > With my old XP computer I could see all my local machines and all the
    > remote
    > machines. File and printer sharing, etc, worked fine and was reliable.
    >
    > With my new Window 7 64 computer I can only see my local machines, and not
    > the
    > remote ones.
    >
    > I can ping all the remote machines ok (those that I know the IP address
    > of).
    >
    > I can make a connection to a particular remote machines using its IP
    > number (as in
    > \\192.168.9.xx\somefolder), but this assumes I know of the existence and
    > IP number
    > of the machine in advance (they do change).
    >
    > If I disable the W7 firewall some of the remote machines do appear
    > sometimes, but
    > usually disappear again quite soon.
    >
    > If this is a firewall blocking problem, how do I tell the firewall to
    > allow it?
    > Why, with the firewall disabled, to they disappear again?
    >
    > If it is not a firewall problem what else might it be?
    >
    > I have tried everything I can think of!
    >


    So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both 192.168.8.xx
    and 192.168.9.xx ?

    --

    Brian Gregory. (In the UK)

    To email me remove the letter vee.
     
    Brian Gregory [UK], Feb 4, 2010
    #6
  7. Ted

    Ted Guest

    On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <> wrote:

    >
    > So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    > 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >
    > --
    >
    > Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >
    > To email me remove the letter vee.


    Sorry, I don't understand that.
    How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?

    The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7

    Ted.
     
    Ted, Feb 5, 2010
    #7
  8. Ted wrote:
    > On Thu, 04 Feb 2010 16:40:42 -0600 The poster formerly known as 'The Poster
    > Formerly Known as Nina DiBoy' <> wrote:
    >
    >> OK Ted, try this next. In Network sharing center, do you have
    >> network discovery and file and printer sharing turned on?

    >
    >
    > Yes I do.
    > I have followed all the usual advice from Microsoft (and others) of how to
    > configure networking several times, in case I had missed something.
    >
    > Everything *seems* to be configured ok, but it just does not work for computers at
    > the other end of the routers VPN link.
    >
    > Ted.
    >


    I have a setup very similar to yours Ted, and with all of the items I
    suggested for you to check, I can see all of the computers on the
    network here.

    My setup is such that we have one domain spread across 4 remote
    locations, each with their own subnet. My windows 7 machine can see all
    of the other machines in the other subnets, and they can see my windows
    7 machine just fine.

    I would suggest next that you speak with Draytek support and see if they
    have any suggestions about how to resolve this with your windows 7
    clients. I wish you success.

    --
    "Software is like sex, it's better when it's free."
    - Linus Torvalds

    DRM and unintended consequences:
    http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=435&tag=nl.e101
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 5, 2010
    #8
  9. Ted

    Ted Guest

    On Fri, 05 Feb 2010 11:44:42 -0600 The poster formerly known as 'The Poster
    Formerly Known as Nina DiBoy' <> wrote:

    >
    > I have a setup very similar to yours Ted, and with all of the items I
    > suggested for you to check, I can see all of the computers on the
    > network here.
    >
    > My setup is such that we have one domain spread across 4 remote
    > locations, each with their own subnet. My windows 7 machine can see
    > all of the other machines in the other subnets, and they can see my
    > windows 7 machine just fine.
    >
    > I would suggest next that you speak with Draytek support and see if
    > they have any suggestions about how to resolve this with your windows
    > 7 clients. I wish you success.
    >
    > --
    > "Software is like sex, it's better when it's free."
    > - Linus Torvalds


    Is it possible for it to be a router issue then?
    As the router works fine with the XP box, I assumed it was not at fault.

    As the 2600 is an old(ish) router, I rather doubt Draytek would be interested. It
    does have the latest available firmware in it.

    I would consider a new router if I *knew* it would fix the problem, as the 2600 is
    not wireless and I am thinking of getting a laptop.

    Ted.
     
    Ted, Feb 5, 2010
    #9
  10. Ted wrote:
    > On Fri, 05 Feb 2010 11:44:42 -0600 The poster formerly known as 'The Poster
    > Formerly Known as Nina DiBoy' <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a setup very similar to yours Ted, and with all of the items I
    >> suggested for you to check, I can see all of the computers on the
    >> network here.
    >>
    >> My setup is such that we have one domain spread across 4 remote
    >> locations, each with their own subnet. My windows 7 machine can see
    >> all of the other machines in the other subnets, and they can see my
    >> windows 7 machine just fine.
    >>
    >> I would suggest next that you speak with Draytek support and see if
    >> they have any suggestions about how to resolve this with your windows
    >> 7 clients. I wish you success.
    >>

    >
    > Is it possible for it to be a router issue then?
    > As the router works fine with the XP box, I assumed it was not at fault.
    >
    > As the 2600 is an old(ish) router, I rather doubt Draytek would be interested. It
    > does have the latest available firmware in it.
    >
    > I would consider a new router if I *knew* it would fix the problem, as the 2600 is
    > not wireless and I am thinking of getting a laptop.
    >
    > Ted.
    >


    Yes, it may be a router problem. Hard to be sure with the limited info
    you provide. I don't know if your networks are each in a domain(s) or
    workgroup(s). Is the router with the VPN an internet appliance, or does
    each computer have vpn client software?

    It's possible that your VPN does not support the new version of windows
    entirely.

    You could determine if the VPN/router is the problem by putting another
    win 7 machine on the local LAN with your current win 7 machine and
    seeing if you can reproduce the problem with the same network settings
    like we talked about, then take the second win 7 machine and put it on
    the other end of the VPN (remote location) and see again if you can
    reproduce the problem.

    IDK if you tried this yet or not, but if your windows 7 machines run
    software firewalls, you could try disabling the windows firewall and use
    a 3rd party firewall for more granular control of what gets through, or
    try with no firewall enabled to see if it helps.

    Since your vista machines work fine and vista is similar to windows 7,
    you may try applying the same network settings to win 7 as vista and see
    how it goes.

    Hope it works out for you.

    --
    "Software is like sex, it's better when it's free."
    - Linus Torvalds

    DRM and unintended consequences:
    http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=435&tag=nl.e101
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 5, 2010
    #10
  11. On 2/05/10, Ted posted:
    > On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <> wrote:


    >>
    >> So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    >> 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >>
    >> To email me remove the letter vee.


    > Sorry, I don't understand that.
    > How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?


    > The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7


    > Ted.


    There is a parameter called a subnet mask; it's usually 255.255.255.0.
    Two IP addresses are in the same subnet if they are identical
    everywhere there is a 1 in the binary expansion of that mask. Since 255
    = 11111111 in binary, that means the above subnet includes every IP
    address where the first three octets (the numbers between the dots)
    agree.

    In "192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx", the third octets disagree. Your
    subnet mask needs to account for that. 255.255.254.0 would work fine,
    if I didn't make an error, since the only difference is in the units
    bit of the third octet.

    This is set in various network configuration panels, but I don't want
    to research it myself at the moment.

    --
    Gene Bloch 650.366.4267 lettersatblochg.com
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Feb 5, 2010
    #11
  12. "Gene E. Bloch" <> wrote in message
    news:hki3kf$hjc$...
    > On 2/05/10, Ted posted:
    >> On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>>
    >>> So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    >>> 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >>>
    >>> To email me remove the letter vee.

    >
    >> Sorry, I don't understand that.
    >> How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?

    >
    >> The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7

    >
    >> Ted.

    >
    > There is a parameter called a subnet mask; it's usually 255.255.255.0.
    > Two IP addresses are in the same subnet if they are identical
    > everywhere there is a 1 in the binary expansion of that mask. Since 255
    > = 11111111 in binary, that means the above subnet includes every IP
    > address where the first three octets (the numbers between the dots)
    > agree.
    >
    > In "192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx", the third octets disagree. Your
    > subnet mask needs to account for that. 255.255.254.0 would work fine,
    > if I didn't make an error, since the only difference is in the units
    > bit of the third octet.
    >
    > This is set in various network configuration panels, but I don't want
    > to research it myself at the moment.


    Yes.

    I was reasoning that presumably Windows 7 would need to believe that the VPN
    addresses were part of the private network it was part of (it wouldn't want
    to let the whole internet get at your shares and printers) and might only
    include the subnet covered by the subnet mask rather than the whole of the
    192.168.xxx.xxx which although they are always local IPs might conceivably
    be some other separate network you don't want to see your shares and
    printers.

    Maybe the router that creates the VPN knows about the and hands out
    appropriate subnet masks via DHCP, but I don't know that. Or maybe the
    Windows 7 PC is at a fixed IP and not using DHCP and has the wronf
    subnetmask set. Or maybe I'm barking up entirely the wrong tree.

    I don't have Windows 7 installed yet so I can't say exactly how to check
    your subnet mask.
    However in Windows XP it's in the properties of the network connection once
    you're connected,
    or you can do ipconfig /all at a command prompt to see info on all your
    network connections.

    Finally how about speaking to Draytek. They're supposed to be very helpful.

    --

    Brian Gregory. (In the UK)

    To email me remove the letter vee.
     
    Brian Gregory [UK], Feb 5, 2010
    #12
  13. "Gene E. Bloch" <> wrote in message
    news:hki3kf$hjc$...
    > On 2/05/10, Ted posted:
    >> On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>>
    >>> So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    >>> 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >>>
    >>> To email me remove the letter vee.

    >
    >> Sorry, I don't understand that.
    >> How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?

    >
    >> The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7

    >
    >> Ted.

    >
    > There is a parameter called a subnet mask; it's usually 255.255.255.0.
    > Two IP addresses are in the same subnet if they are identical
    > everywhere there is a 1 in the binary expansion of that mask. Since 255
    > = 11111111 in binary, that means the above subnet includes every IP
    > address where the first three octets (the numbers between the dots)
    > agree.
    >
    > In "192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx", the third octets disagree. Your
    > subnet mask needs to account for that. 255.255.254.0 would work fine,
    > if I didn't make an error, since the only difference is in the units
    > bit of the third octet.
    >
    > This is set in various network configuration panels, but I don't want
    > to research it myself at the moment.



    Yes.

    I was reasoning that presumably Windows 7 would need to believe that the VPN
    addresses were part of the private network it was part of (it wouldn't want
    to let the whole internet get at your shares and printers) and might only
    include the subnet covered by the subnet mask rather than the whole of the
    192.168.xxx.xxx which although they are always local IPs might conceivably
    be some other separate network you don't want to see your shares and
    printers.

    Maybe the router that creates the VPN knows about this and hands out
    appropriate subnet masks via DHCP, but I don't know that. Or maybe the
    Windows 7 PC is at a fixed IP and not using DHCP and has the wrong subnet
    mask configured. Or maybe I'm barking up entirely the wrong tree.

    I don't have Windows 7 installed yet so I can't say exactly how to check
    your subnet mask.
    However in Windows XP it's in the properties of the network connection once
    you're connected,
    or you can do ipconfig /all at a command prompt to see info on all your
    network connections.

    Finally how about speaking to Draytek. They're supposed to be very helpful.

    --

    Brian Gregory. (In the UK)

    To email me remove the letter vee.
     
    Brian Gregory [UK], Feb 5, 2010
    #13
  14. On 2/05/10, Brian Gregory [UK] posted:
    > "Gene E. Bloch" <> wrote in message
    > news:hki3kf$hjc$...
    >> On 2/05/10, Ted posted:
    >>> On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <>
    >>> wrote:

    >>
    >>>>
    >>>> So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    >>>> 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >>>>
    >>>> To email me remove the letter vee.

    >>
    >>> Sorry, I don't understand that.
    >>> How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?

    >>
    >>> The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7

    >>
    >>> Ted.

    >>
    >> There is a parameter called a subnet mask; it's usually 255.255.255.0.
    >> Two IP addresses are in the same subnet if they are identical
    >> everywhere there is a 1 in the binary expansion of that mask. Since 255
    >> = 11111111 in binary, that means the above subnet includes every IP
    >> address where the first three octets (the numbers between the dots)
    >> agree.
    >>
    >> In "192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx", the third octets disagree. Your
    >> subnet mask needs to account for that. 255.255.254.0 would work fine,
    >> if I didn't make an error, since the only difference is in the units
    >> bit of the third octet.
    >>
    >> This is set in various network configuration panels, but I don't want
    >> to research it myself at the moment.


    > Yes.


    > I was reasoning that presumably Windows 7 would need to believe that the VPN
    > addresses were part of the private network it was part of (it wouldn't want
    > to let the whole internet get at your shares and printers) and might only
    > include the subnet covered by the subnet mask rather than the whole of the
    > 192.168.xxx.xxx which although they are always local IPs might conceivably be
    > some other separate network you don't want to see your shares and printers.


    > Maybe the router that creates the VPN knows about the and hands out
    > appropriate subnet masks via DHCP, but I don't know that. Or maybe the
    > Windows 7 PC is at a fixed IP and not using DHCP and has the wronf subnetmask
    > set. Or maybe I'm barking up entirely the wrong tree.


    > I don't have Windows 7 installed yet so I can't say exactly how to check your
    > subnet mask.
    > However in Windows XP it's in the properties of the network connection once
    > you're connected,
    > or you can do ipconfig /all at a command prompt to see info on all your
    > network connections.


    > Finally how about speaking to Draytek. They're supposed to be very helpful.


    Of course, I totally agree with your reasoning. But I was replying to
    the OP, who said he didn't know what that all meant, and I was hoping I
    could help him.

    It took me about three tries to get the mask right. Getting rusty :)

    --
    Gene Bloch 650.366.4267 lettersatblochg.com
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Feb 6, 2010
    #14
  15. Ted

    Seth Guest

    "Gene E. Bloch" <> wrote in message
    news:hki3kf$hjc$...
    > On 2/05/10, Ted posted:
    >> On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 23:42:49 -0000 Brian Gregory [UK] <>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>>
    >>> So your local subnet on the W7 machine is set to include both
    >>> 192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx ?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Brian Gregory. (In the UK)
    >>>
    >>> To email me remove the letter vee.

    >
    >> Sorry, I don't understand that.
    >> How do I set a "local subnet" on the W7 machine?

    >
    >> The VPN link is in the router itself. It is not a VPN link created in W7

    >
    >> Ted.

    >
    > There is a parameter called a subnet mask; it's usually 255.255.255.0. Two
    > IP addresses are in the same subnet if they are identical everywhere there
    > is a 1 in the binary expansion of that mask. Since 255 = 11111111 in
    > binary, that means the above subnet includes every IP address where the
    > first three octets (the numbers between the dots) agree.
    >
    > In "192.168.8.xx and 192.168.9.xx", the third octets disagree. Your subnet
    > mask needs to account for that. 255.255.254.0 would work fine, if I didn't
    > make an error, since the only difference is in the units bit of the third
    > octet.


    That won't work with consumer class routers. They can't handle the
    translation properly to go across the WAN link like that.

    The easier thing to do (and proper form a managed network perspective) is to
    host ones own DNS within the private network.

    > This is set in various network configuration panels, but I don't want to
    > research it myself at the moment.
    >
    > --
    > Gene Bloch 650.366.4267 lettersatblochg.com
    >
    >
     
    Seth, Feb 6, 2010
    #15
  16. Ted

    Ted Guest

    Thanks to everyone for all the advice and suggestions.

    I am a bit out of my depth here. This is obviously not a simple issue, and I need
    to do some more research, so that I can least ask the right questions!

    As it all worked fine before with the XP box, I was hoping for a simple answer :)

    Ted.
     
    Ted, Feb 6, 2010
    #16
  17. Ted

    lugnut Guest

    On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 17:38 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
    (Ted) wrote:

    >I have just replaced my main XP computer with a Windows 7 64 computer.
    >
    >I have a Draytek Vigor2600 router with inbuilt VPN that connects to another similar
    >router over the internet.
    >
    >Both local and remote computers are a mixture of XP, Vista machines, with some
    >printers and other boxes.
    >
    >The local machines are all on 192.168.8.x subnet.
    >The remote machines are all on 192.168.9.x subnet.
    >
    >With my old XP computer I could see all my local machines and all the remote
    >machines. File and printer sharing, etc, worked fine and was reliable.
    >
    >With my new Window 7 64 computer I can only see my local machines, and not the
    >remote ones.
    >
    >I can ping all the remote machines ok (those that I know the IP address of).
    >
    >I can make a connection to a particular remote machines using its IP number (as in
    >\\192.168.9.xx\somefolder), but this assumes I know of the existence and IP number
    >of the machine in advance (they do change).
    >
    >If I disable the W7 firewall some of the remote machines do appear sometimes, but
    >usually disappear again quite soon.
    >
    >If this is a firewall blocking problem, how do I tell the firewall to allow it?
    >Why, with the firewall disabled, to they disappear again?
    >
    >If it is not a firewall problem what else might it be?
    >
    >I have tried everything I can think of!
    >
    >Ted.



    I had this problem with one machine that was on XP SP2. It
    worked fine after SP3 install. Somewhere, I found a MS
    article indicating that a file from MS had to be installed
    for them to see each other. That file is part of SP3 which
    you should probably have anyway. Not much help but all I
    have at the moment is my LTA memory.

    Lugnut
     
    lugnut, Feb 6, 2010
    #17
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