Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender?

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Yousuf Khan, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    brain-dead-ness.

    Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips &
    Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Mar 26, 2011
    #1
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  2. Yousuf Khan

    Dick Guest

    On 3/26/2011 9:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    > anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    > "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    > this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    > However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    > a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    > people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    > brain-dead-ness.
    >
    > Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips &
    > Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    > http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx
    >
    >
    > Yousuf Khan


    Yousuf,

    I have been using Microsoft Security Essentials for about 9 months, now.
    Before that I used Norton and I also tried AVG. I switched to MSSE
    because the Norton and AVG were both resource hogs.

    Using MSSE is like getting a new machine: the response is snappy and it
    does the job of defending my machine against attacks. I have never had
    a virus get past any of my programs (ie Norton, AVG, or MSSE). I use it
    on two machines that run Windows 7 and One that runs XP.

    At least, that's my experience. I really like it.

    Dick
     
    Dick, Mar 26, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Yousuf Khan

    Big Steel Guest

    On 3/26/2011 9:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    > anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    > "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    > this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    > However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    > a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    > people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    > brain-dead-ness.


    I use MS Security Essentials on my Windows 7 desktop computer. Any AV
    solution can get a false positive hit.

    I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.

    http://blogs.sitepoint.com/microsoft-security-essentials-review/

    I got no problems using MS Security Essentials. It may replace Nod32,
    because I may not want to shell out the dollars.
     
    Big Steel, Mar 26, 2011
    #3
  4. Dick wrote:
    > On 3/26/2011 9:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >> Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    >> anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour
    >> it "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I
    >> figured this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to
    >> Avira. However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it
    >> performs: is it a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to
    >> it eventually if people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft
    >> fixes its brain-dead-ness.
    >>
    >> Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips
    >> & Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs


    > Yousuf,
    >
    > I have been using Microsoft Security Essentials for about 9 months,
    > now. Before that I used Norton and I also tried AVG. I switched to
    > MSSE because the Norton and AVG were both resource hogs.
    >
    > Using MSSE is like getting a new machine: the response is snappy and
    > it does the job of defending my machine against attacks. I have
    > never had a virus get past any of my programs (ie Norton, AVG, or
    > MSSE). I use it on two machines that run Windows 7 and One that runs
    > XP.
    >
    > At least, that's my experience. I really like it.


    Me, too, and I'd rather have an occasional false positive (I've never
    had one) than a missed Trojan.
    --
    Crash

    "The future ain't what it used to be."
    ~ Yogi Berra ~
     
    Dave \Crash\ Dummy, Mar 26, 2011
    #4
  5. Yousuf Khan

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Yousuf.

    Like Dick, Crash and Steel, I've been using MSE a couple of years, since it
    was in beta, and it has done an excellent job for me. And since it takes
    over Windows Defender's duties, too, and disables Defender, the question in
    your Subject is moot.

    Ever since my subscription to Norton Internet Security 2005 expired (because
    Norton never updated it or NIS 2006 for 64-bit Windows XP), I've been
    "running bare" and loving it - until MSE came along. Except for an
    occasional (about weekly) reminder to run a Quick Scan, I just about forget
    that MSE is there.

    Last week, for the first time in many years, I had a malware scare. My bank
    had been using Trusteer's Rapport to validate its secure connection, and
    Rapport's green logo stopped appearing. I tried re-installing Rapport, and
    then MSE began to detect "PWS:HTML/Bankfraud" - and Removed it. After an
    Internet search, I concluded that Rapport was more trouble - and risk - than
    it was worth, so I had Win7's Programs and Features uninstall it. Then MSE
    stopped complaining, and a scan with Malware Bytes came up clean, too. ;<)

    MSE is free, its definitions are updated at least daily (silently, if you
    choose), and I've seen nobody complaining of its ineffectiveness. (Dick's
    report of a false positive is the first one I've seen.)

    My main malware protection is ME - and "practicing safe hex". Your mileage
    may vary, of course. ;^}

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP (2002-9/30/10)
    Windows Live Mail Version 2011 (Build 15.4.3508.1109) in Win7 Ultimate x64
    SP1


    "Yousuf Khan" wrote in message news:4d8df0e4$-lp.com...

    Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    brain-dead-ness.

    Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips &
    Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx

    Yousuf Khan
     
    R. C. White, Mar 26, 2011
    #5
  6. Yousuf Khan

    Chet Guest

    On 3/26/2011 8:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    > anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an
    > hour it "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files.
    > So I figured this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went
    > back to Avira. However, false positives aside, I'd like to know
    > how it performs: is it a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go
    > back to it eventually if people find it is not too obtrusive, and
    > Microsoft fixes its brain-dead-ness.
    >
    > Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security
    > Tips & Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    > http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx
    >
    >
    > Yousuf Khan


    I'll add my 2cents for what it's worth!

    I've been using MS Security Essentials as my realtime protection
    for some time now on my six machines (2-Win7 Home Premium x64
    laptops, 2-Win7 Pro x64 desktops, 1-WinXP Pro x86 desktop & 1
    WinXP Home x86 desktop) and haven't had any problems.

    I was a *long time* user of Norton's Anti-Virus from the Win95
    days (installed it from floppies!) and later their Internet
    Security suite; but over time got tired of the expense and
    especially the noticeable overall system slowdown - even on a
    fairly powerful machine.

    I also use Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware and SUPERAntiSpyware (both
    free versions) for weekly scans and since switching to MSE they
    haven't found a single threat. When using Symantic's product
    occasionally one or both would detect a possible threat that
    Norton had missed. When researching the possible threat further
    and with additional scans (online and local) Malwarebytes and/or
    SUPER would always be correct with Norton just plain missing it!

    In fact, my additional weekly scans have become more like
    bi-weekly (and sometimes monthly) as I tend to trust MSE more -
    hopefully this won't come back and bite my in the a**!

    Just my thoughts!
    --
    Chet <>
    To reply remove SPAM NOT
     
    Chet, Mar 26, 2011
    #6
  7. Yousuf Khan

    relic Guest

    "Big Steel" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 3/26/2011 9:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >> Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    >> anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    >> "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    >> this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    >> However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    >> a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    >> people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    >> brain-dead-ness.

    >
    > I use MS Security Essentials on my Windows 7 desktop computer. Any AV
    > solution can get a false positive hit.
    >
    > I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.


    Do you know what triggered it? (I've used NOD32 for 11 years and haven't
    seen one yet.)


    >
    > http://blogs.sitepoint.com/microsoft-security-essentials-review/
    >
    > I got no problems using MS Security Essentials. It may replace Nod32,
    > because I may not want to shell out the dollars.
     
    relic, Mar 26, 2011
    #7
  8. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    On 11-03-26 10:13 AM, Dick wrote:
    > I have been using Microsoft Security Essentials for about 9 months, now.
    > Before that I used Norton and I also tried AVG. I switched to MSSE
    > because the Norton and AVG were both resource hogs.
    >
    > Using MSSE is like getting a new machine: the response is snappy and it
    > does the job of defending my machine against attacks. I have never had a
    > virus get past any of my programs (ie Norton, AVG, or MSSE). I use it on
    > two machines that run Windows 7 and One that runs XP.
    >
    > At least, that's my experience. I really like it.
    >
    > Dick


    I agree with you about Norton and AVG, both are huge hogs. AVG used to
    be quite lean and mean, but it's been slowly getting as bad as the big
    boys. That's why I had switched to Avira. I started using Avira on my
    laptop, which is much older and less powerful than my desktop, because
    AVG was just stopping it dead in its tracks. Then eventually I found
    even my desktop was getting bogged down by AVG, so the switch happened
    across the board.

    I really appreciate low-intrusion anti-virals.

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Mar 26, 2011
    #8
  9. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    On 11-03-26 10:27 AM, Big Steel wrote:
    > I use MS Security Essentials on my Windows 7 desktop computer. Any AV
    > solution can get a false positive hit.
    >
    > I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.


    That's true, and I've gotten false positives on both AVG and Avira
    before. But really, getting a false positive on what is obviously an AVI
    video file, is a bit brain-dead. It has no business scanning something
    like that at all.

    Secondly, if there is a false positive, how easy is it to get to the
    developers to report the false positive? I've had good success with both
    AVG and Avira in being able to easily upload the false positive file to
    their email account or a website repository, and they've sent back
    reports to me stating that they did indeed find it to be a false
    positive, and they made alterations to the scanning signature right
    away. That goes a long way for me towards establishing a good opinion of
    the product -- everybody makes mistakes, but do you correct it quickly
    and without hassles?

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Mar 26, 2011
    #9
  10. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    On 11-03-26 12:54 PM, Chet wrote:
    > I also use Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware and SUPERAntiSpyware (both free
    > versions) for weekly scans and since switching to MSE they haven't found
    > a single threat. When using Symantic's product occasionally one or both
    > would detect a possible threat that Norton had missed. When researching
    > the possible threat further and with additional scans (online and local)
    > Malwarebytes and/or SUPER would always be correct with Norton just plain
    > missing it!
    >
    > In fact, my additional weekly scans have become more like bi-weekly (and
    > sometimes monthly) as I tend to trust MSE more - hopefully this won't
    > come back and bite my in the a**!
    >
    > Just my thoughts!


    Sounds good, but I still don't trust it as my primary security software,
    not after that completely stupid false positive. But I wouldn't mind
    using it as a scheduled task to scan for spyware. I'd rather not keep it
    loaded in real-time. I'll use the Avira for that, and use MSE
    occasionally. Is this possible to do with MSE keep it installed but not
    real-time?

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Mar 26, 2011
    #10
  11. Yousuf Khan

    Ken Blake Guest

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:21:07 -0700, "relic" <> wrote:

    >
    > "Big Steel" <> wrote in message
    > news:...


    > > I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.

    >
    > Do you know what triggered it? (I've used NOD32 for 11 years and haven't
    > seen one yet.)



    I haven't used NOD32 for as long as you, but it's been three or four
    years now. Not to say that a false positive isn't possible with any
    anti-virus, but I've never gotten one from NOD32 either.
     
    Ken Blake, Mar 26, 2011
    #11
  12. Yousuf Khan

    Big Steel Guest

    On 3/26/2011 2:41 PM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > On 11-03-26 10:27 AM, Big Steel wrote:
    >> I use MS Security Essentials on my Windows 7 desktop computer. Any AV
    >> solution can get a false positive hit.
    >>
    >> I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.

    >
    > That's true, and I've gotten false positives on both AVG and Avira
    > before. But really, getting a false positive on what is obviously an AVI
    > video file, is a bit brain-dead. It has no business scanning something
    > like that at all.
    >

    You do know you can exclude that file type from the scan. But what's to
    say that the file type has been faked and it is a virus?

    > Secondly, if there is a false positive, how easy is it to get to the
    > developers to report the false positive? I've had good success with both
    > AVG and Avira in being able to easily upload the false positive file to
    > their email account or a website repository, and they've sent back
    > reports to me stating that they did indeed find it to be a false
    > positive, and they made alterations to the scanning signature right
    > away. That goes a long way for me towards establishing a good opinion of
    > the product -- everybody makes mistakes, but do you correct it quickly
    > and without hassles?
    >


    I don't think it's that big of a deal. It's certainly something I
    wouldn't give it much thought and haven't.
     
    Big Steel, Mar 26, 2011
    #12
  13. Yousuf Khan

    Big Steel Guest

    On 3/26/2011 3:46 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 11:21:07 -0700, "relic"<> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Big Steel"<> wrote in message
    >> news:...

    >
    >>> I use Nod32 on my laptop Vista, and it has gotten false positive hits.

    >>
    >> Do you know what triggered it? (I've used NOD32 for 11 years and haven't
    >> seen one yet.)

    >
    >
    > I haven't used NOD32 for as long as you, but it's been three or four
    > years now. Not to say that a false positive isn't possible with any
    > anti-virus, but I've never gotten one from NOD32 either.


    I got the hits many years ago using Nod32, but it got a couple of them
    over the years.
     
    Big Steel, Mar 26, 2011
    #13
  14. Yousuf Khan

    Ken Blake Guest

    On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 14:48:09 -0400, Yousuf Khan
    <> wrote:


    > Sounds good, but I still don't trust it as my primary security software,
    > not after that completely stupid false positive.



    Bear in mind that *no* anti-virus program is perfect, and a false
    positive is always possible. If you get *many* of them, then your
    anti-virus is poor, but I wouldn't stop using a product for a single
    false positive. Microsoft Security Essentials is an excellent product.


    > I'd rather not keep it loaded in real-time. I'll use the Avira for that.



    Avira is also an excellent product. I don't think it's any better than
    Microsoft Security Essentials, though.
     
    Ken Blake, Mar 26, 2011
    #14
  15. Yousuf Khan

    Chet Guest

    On 3/26/2011 1:48 PM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >
    > Sounds good, but I still don't trust it as my primary security
    > software, not after that completely stupid false positive. But I
    > wouldn't mind using it as a scheduled task to scan for spyware.
    > I'd rather not keep it loaded in real-time. I'll use the Avira
    > for that, and use MSE occasionally. Is this possible to do with
    > MSE keep it installed but not real-time?
    >


    Yes, you can turn MSE's realtime protection off. From the
    Settings tab click Real-time Protection; you'll see you can
    uncheck it.

    hth
    --
    Chet <>
    To reply remove SPAM NOT
     
    Chet, Mar 26, 2011
    #15
  16. Yousuf Khan

    Flint Guest

    On 3/26/2011 9:57 AM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    > anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    > "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    > this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    > However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is
    > it a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    > people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    > brain-dead-ness.
    >
    > Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips &
    > Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    > http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx
    >
    >
    > Yousuf Khan



    It's not too bad, ad of course it plays nice with Windows Defender
    better than most others, but as you say, its detection is a tad
    froggy/jumpy on some things.

    One is better off with the "A" brand stuff (Avast, AVG, or Avira), AFAIC.

    --
    MFB
     
    Flint, Mar 27, 2011
    #16
  17. Yousuf Khan

    Flint Guest

    On 3/26/2011 3:55 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    > On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 14:48:09 -0400, Yousuf Khan
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Sounds good, but I still don't trust it as my primary security software,
    >> not after that completely stupid false positive.

    >
    >
    > Bear in mind that *no* anti-virus program is perfect, and a false
    > positive is always possible. If you get *many* of them, then your
    > anti-virus is poor, but I wouldn't stop using a product for a single
    > false positive. Microsoft Security Essentials is an excellent product.
    >
    >
    >> I'd rather not keep it loaded in real-time. I'll use the Avira for that.

    >
    >
    > Avira is also an excellent product. I don't think it's any better than
    > Microsoft Security Essentials, though.



    I was an AVG user for nearly 10 years, and I've occasionally run
    across a few false positives with it as well as every other antivirus
    I've ever used. The worst offender I ran across for this was F-Prot.

    AVG, as noted by another poster (as well as several other techs I
    know) has become bloated and sluggish in the same manner as Norton and
    McAffee, so I switched to Avast!. Avast is a bit sluggish too, but
    one can easily disable any of its "shield" (real-time) components, and
    it offers excellent parameter fine tuning. The feature that finally
    got me to switch over to it was its email scanner handles SSL
    connections much easier and w/less hassle w/more email clients than
    AVG's "127.0.0.1" 'two step shuffle' config process.

    Overall, I tend to prefer a combination of:

    Avast!, (active real time shields)
    weekly 3AM Sunday disk scans,

    Malwarebytes, (scheduled weekly, Sundays 5AM)

    Windowe Defender (daily 2AM scans, & active real time)

    Spybot Search & Destroy - manually run, tea timer disabled in
    Vista/W7, but active on XP systems.

    --
    MFB
     
    Flint, Mar 27, 2011
    #17
  18. Yousuf Khan

    Big Steel Guest

    On 3/27/2011 3:07 AM, Flint wrote:
    > On 3/26/2011 3:55 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
    >> On Sat, 26 Mar 2011 14:48:09 -0400, Yousuf Khan
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Sounds good, but I still don't trust it as my primary security software,
    >>> not after that completely stupid false positive.

    >>
    >>
    >> Bear in mind that *no* anti-virus program is perfect, and a false
    >> positive is always possible. If you get *many* of them, then your
    >> anti-virus is poor, but I wouldn't stop using a product for a single
    >> false positive. Microsoft Security Essentials is an excellent product.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I'd rather not keep it loaded in real-time. I'll use the Avira for that.

    >>
    >>
    >> Avira is also an excellent product. I don't think it's any better than
    >> Microsoft Security Essentials, though.

    >
    >
    > I was an AVG user for nearly 10 years, and I've occasionally run across
    > a few false positives with it as well as every other antivirus I've ever
    > used. The worst offender I ran across for this was F-Prot.
    >
    > AVG, as noted by another poster (as well as several other techs I know)
    > has become bloated and sluggish in the same manner as Norton and
    > McAffee, so I switched to Avast!. Avast is a bit sluggish too, but one
    > can easily disable any of its "shield" (real-time) components, and it
    > offers excellent parameter fine tuning. The feature that finally got me
    > to switch over to it was its email scanner handles SSL connections much
    > easier and w/less hassle w/more email clients than AVG's "127.0.0.1"
    > 'two step shuffle' config process.
    >
    > Overall, I tend to prefer a combination of:
    >
    > Avast!, (active real time shields)
    > weekly 3AM Sunday disk scans,
    >
    > Malwarebytes, (scheduled weekly, Sundays 5AM)
    >
    > Windowe Defender (daily 2AM scans, & active real time)
    >
    > Spybot Search & Destroy - manually run, tea timer disabled in Vista/W7,
    > but active on XP systems.
    >


    What? Are you serious? Why don't you toss the sink in there too? :)
     
    Big Steel, Mar 27, 2011
    #18
  19. Yousuf Khan

    Jeff Layman Guest

    On 26/03/2011 13:57, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    > Is anyone using Microsoft Security Essentials as their
    > anti-virus/anti-spyware program? I used it briefly, within an hour it
    > "discovered" a trojan inside one of my AVI video files. So I figured
    > this program is about as dumb as algae, and I went back to Avira.
    > However, false positives aside, I'd like to know how it performs: is it
    > a resource hog, obtrusive, etc. I might go back to it eventually if
    > people find it is not too obtrusive, and Microsoft fixes its
    > brain-dead-ness.
    >
    > Microsoft Security Essentials vs. Windows Defender - Security Tips &
    > Talk - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
    > http://blogs.msdn.com/b/securitytip...-security-essentials-vs-windows-defender.aspx
    >


    Just been trying it on an old XPH machine. Seems OK, but I find it
    annoying that I can't turn automatic updating off, and update only when
    I want to. And that is an issue, because like all downloads from MS
    sites, it takes an age to download the latest definitions.

    --

    Jeff
     
    Jeff Layman, Mar 27, 2011
    #19
  20. Yousuf Khan

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    On 26/03/2011 3:46 PM, Big Steel wrote:
    > On 3/26/2011 2:41 PM, Yousuf Khan wrote:
    >> That's true, and I've gotten false positives on both AVG and Avira
    >> before. But really, getting a false positive on what is obviously an AVI
    >> video file, is a bit brain-dead. It has no business scanning something
    >> like that at all.
    >>

    > You do know you can exclude that file type from the scan. But what's to
    > say that the file type has been faked and it is a virus?


    Most other anti-virals know to exclude these files by default. If a file
    has been faked, then it won't run, it'll simply be considered a data file.

    >
    >> Secondly, if there is a false positive, how easy is it to get to the
    >> developers to report the false positive? I've had good success with both
    >> AVG and Avira in being able to easily upload the false positive file to
    >> their email account or a website repository, and they've sent back
    >> reports to me stating that they did indeed find it to be a false
    >> positive, and they made alterations to the scanning signature right
    >> away. That goes a long way for me towards establishing a good opinion of
    >> the product -- everybody makes mistakes, but do you correct it quickly
    >> and without hassles?
    >>

    >
    > I don't think it's that big of a deal. It's certainly something I
    > wouldn't give it much thought and haven't.


    Well, I've done it before, and therefore I find it useful.

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Mar 27, 2011
    #20
    1. Advertising

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