Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refresh rate to stick after cloning an image?

Discussion in 'alt.windows7.general' started by Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 13, 2012.

  1. Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    annoying behaviors of Win 7!

    Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    after an image dump?

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 13, 2012
    #1
  2. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 11:13:30 -0500, "Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]" <.@.>
    wrote in article <>...
    >
    > Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    > 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    > resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    > came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >
    > Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    > wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    > after an image dump?
    >
    > - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]


    I don't know how to prevent it, I use a utility to force the resolution
    to what I want it to be and have it triggered by a runonce when the
    image is booted for the first time.

    The utility I use was written in-house but there are several utilities
    out there that can do it - NirCmd for one
    <http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd.html>

    --
    Zaphod

    "The best Bang since the Big One" - Eccentrica Gallumbits
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Sep 13, 2012
    #2
  3. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    Wolf K Guest

    Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 13/09/2012 12:13 PM, Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP] wrote:
    > Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    > 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    > resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    > came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >
    > Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    > wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    > after an image dump?
    >
    > - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]


    a) Refresh rate has nothing to do with the image. It's a monitor
    specification. Video cards are built to provide a variety of refresh
    rates to match different monitors. If you try to change the refresh
    rate, you will certainly get weird artefacts in the image, and you may
    damage your monitor.

    b) Resolution is another monitor specification, and you should run the
    monitor at its native resolution. On LCD/LED monitors, that happens to
    be a physical spec. If you change it, the video card will "dither" the
    image, which will result in fuzziness.

    c) Display size is set by the image viewing software, not the OS. The
    default is "fit to window if larger than window", as you may notice if
    you use the window controls to shrink/expand the display window and/or
    the image. Fit-to-window also results in fuzziness, some display
    software can be set to "display original size". If you use Windows built
    in image viewer, you're stuck with limited controls and options.

    HTH

    --
    Best,
    Wolf K
    kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
    Wolf K, Sep 13, 2012
    #3
  4. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 13:06:55 -0400, "Wolf K" <>
    wrote in article <Joo4s.107721$>...
    >
    > On 13/09/2012 12:13 PM, Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP] wrote:
    > > Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    > > 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    > > resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    > > came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > > will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > > refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > > annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    > >
    > > Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    > > wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    > > after an image dump?
    > >
    > > - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    >
    > a) Refresh rate has nothing to do with the image. It's a monitor
    > specification. Video cards are built to provide a variety of refresh
    > rates to match different monitors. If you try to change the refresh
    > rate, you will certainly get weird artefacts in the image, and you may
    > damage your monitor.


    We are talking about two different types of image. This is a system /
    OS / drive image that you deploy / clone to a new computer so that each
    one is identical, not a graphical image as in gif, etc.

    >
    > b) Resolution is another monitor specification, and you should run the
    > monitor at its native resolution. On LCD/LED monitors, that happens to
    > be a physical spec. If you change it, the video card will "dither" the
    > image, which will result in fuzziness.



    True, but many times PCs are deployed with built-for-purpose software
    that works best at a particular resolution, regardless of the native
    resolution of the display. Modern LCD displays do a remarkably good
    job of handling non-native resolutions with minimal blurring /
    fuzziness so this really isn't an issue.

    >
    > c) Display size is set by the image viewing software, not the OS. The
    > default is "fit to window if larger than window", as you may notice if
    > you use the window controls to shrink/expand the display window and/or
    > the image. Fit-to-window also results in fuzziness, some display
    > software can be set to "display original size". If you use Windows built
    > in image viewer, you're stuck with limited controls and options.
    >


    Again, different kind of image.

    --
    Zaphod

    Adventurer, ex-hippie, good-timer (crook? quite possibly),
    manic self-publicist, terrible bad at personal relationships,
    often thought to be completely out to lunch.
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Sep 13, 2012
    #4
  5. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    Wolf K Guest

    Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    [...]
    > Again, different kind of image.


    I eventually figured that out. ;-)

    --
    Best,
    Wolf K
    kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
    Wolf K, Sep 13, 2012
    #5
  6. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:55:14 -0400, Wolf K wrote:

    > On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > [...]
    >> Again, different kind of image.

    >
    > I eventually figured that out. ;-)


    I didn't.

    Well, I did when I read Zaphod's post, but that hardly counts as my
    figuring it out.

    Thanks, ZB. My head has now stopped spinning.

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)
    Gene E. Bloch, Sep 14, 2012
    #6
  7. Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 2012-09-13 12:13 PM, Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP] wrote:
    > Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    > 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    > resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    > came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >
    > Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    > wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    > after an image dump?
    >
    > - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    >


    The "Windows System Image Manager (WSIM)" which is a part of the
    "Windows Automated Installation Kit" <
    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=5753
    > & < http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5188 >

    can be used to build up a SysPrep answer file (*.xml).

    WSIM is free and nightmarish, but it gives you granular control over
    every step of the processes of preparing an OS with Sysprep for
    duplication and how it should look and behave once it comes out of Sysprep.

    --
    [Robert]
    Robert Sudbury, Sep 14, 2012
    #7
  8. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    Wolf K Guest

    Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    [...]
    > Since Windows 7
    > came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > annoying behaviors of Win 7!

    [...]

    OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?

    --
    Best,
    Wolf K
    kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
    Wolf K, Sep 14, 2012
    #8
  9. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 22:21:54 -0400, Wolf K <>
    wrote:

    >On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    >[...]
    >> Since Windows 7
    >> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >> annoying behaviors of Win 7!

    >[...]
    >
    >OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    >question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    >refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?


    For me, I have two systems using the one monitor by KVM. I
    prefer that they be at the same resolution. My XP system is at what
    it is because I like it and it is also standard for an app I maintain.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
    Gene Wirchenko, Sep 14, 2012
    #9
  10. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    Char Jackson Guest

    On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 19:57:24 -0700, Gene Wirchenko <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 22:21:54 -0400, Wolf K <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    >>[...]
    >>> Since Windows 7
    >>> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >>> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >>> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >>> annoying behaviors of Win 7!

    >>[...]
    >>
    >>OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    >>question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    >>refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?

    >
    > For me, I have two systems using the one monitor by KVM. I
    >prefer that they be at the same resolution. My XP system is at what
    >it is because I like it and it is also standard for an app I maintain.


    The way I see it, your single monitor has a single native resolution
    and both systems should be running at THAT resolution, but different
    strokes for different folks. :)

    --

    Char Jackson
    Char Jackson, Sep 14, 2012
    #10
  11. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:55:14 -0400, "Wolf K" <>
    wrote in article <wSq4s.108149$>...
    >
    > On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > [...]
    > > Again, different kind of image.

    >
    > I eventually figured that out. ;-)


    See, there's hope for you yet! ;-)

    --
    Zaphod

    Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, ya know? - Gag Halfrunt
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Sep 14, 2012
    #11
  12. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 16:52:30 -0700, "Gene E. Bloch" <not-
    d> wrote in article <18zedbouilia
    $>...
    >
    > On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:55:14 -0400, Wolf K wrote:
    >
    > > On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > > [...]
    > >> Again, different kind of image.

    > >
    > > I eventually figured that out. ;-)

    >
    > I didn't.
    >
    > Well, I did when I read Zaphod's post, but that hardly counts as my
    > figuring it out.
    >
    > Thanks, ZB. My head has now stopped spinning.


    YW. It usually takes a couple of solid whacks up side my head with a
    2x4 to stop mine spinning. Darkness, blessed darkness...

    --
    Zaphod

    The secret of flying is to hurl yourself to the ground, and miss.
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Sep 14, 2012
    #12
  13. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    BillW50 Guest

    Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 9/14/2012 7:10 AM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 16:52:30 -0700, "Gene E. Bloch"<not-
    > d> wrote in article<18zedbouilia
    > $>...
    >>
    >> On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:55:14 -0400, Wolf K wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    >>> [...]
    >>>> Again, different kind of image.
    >>>
    >>> I eventually figured that out. ;-)

    >>
    >> I didn't.
    >>
    >> Well, I did when I read Zaphod's post, but that hardly counts as my
    >> figuring it out.
    >>
    >> Thanks, ZB. My head has now stopped spinning.

    >
    > YW. It usually takes a couple of solid whacks up side my head with a
    > 2x4 to stop mine spinning. Darkness, blessed darkness...


    Oh that explains a lot!

    --
    Bill
    Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Thunderbird v12.0.1
    Centrino Core2 Duo T5600 1.83GHz - 4GB - Windows XP SP2
    BillW50, Sep 14, 2012
    #13
  14. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 23:54:04 -0500, "Char Jackson" <>
    wrote in article <>...
    >
    > On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 19:57:24 -0700, Gene Wirchenko <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 22:21:54 -0400, Wolf K <>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >>On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    > >>[...]
    > >>> Since Windows 7
    > >>> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    > >>> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    > >>> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    > >>> annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    > >>[...]
    > >>
    > >>OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    > >>question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    > >>refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?

    > >
    > > For me, I have two systems using the one monitor by KVM. I
    > >prefer that they be at the same resolution. My XP system is at what
    > >it is because I like it and it is also standard for an app I maintain.

    >
    > The way I see it, your single monitor has a single native resolution
    > and both systems should be running at THAT resolution, but different
    > strokes for different folks. :)


    In my case it has more to do with an issue outside of my control:
    Poorly coded software that doesn't behave properly at anything other
    than the "one true resolution" for which it was written. So, I either
    develop and deploy images at that resolution or I get unhappy users,
    field trainers, and technical support staff. Oh, and unhappy bosses.
    Those are the worst :/

    --
    Zaphod

    Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
    something big and sinister going on in the world.
    Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
    universe gets that.
    Zaphod Beeblebrox, Sep 14, 2012
    #14
  15. Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    Wolf K Guest

    Re: Anyone know of a hack to force monitor resolution and refreshrate to stick after cloning an image?

    On 14/09/2012 8:09 AM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    > On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 15:55:14 -0400, "Wolf K"<>
    > wrote in article<wSq4s.108149$>...
    >>
    >> On 13/09/2012 1:14 PM, Zaphod Beeblebrox wrote:
    >> [...]
    >>> Again, different kind of image.

    >>
    >> I eventually figured that out. ;-)

    >
    > See, there's hope for you yet! ;-)
    >


    Well, it better work a little faster, I'm past the three-score-and-ten
    already!

    --
    Best,
    Wolf K
    kirkwood40.blogspot.ca
    Wolf K, Sep 14, 2012
    #15
  16. >On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 11:13:30 -0500, "Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]" <.@.>
    >wrote in article <>...
    >>
    >> Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    >> 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    >> resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    >> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >> annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >>
    >> Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    >> wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    >> after an image dump?
    >>
    >> - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]

    >
    >I don't know how to prevent it, I use a utility to force the resolution
    >to what I want it to be and have it triggered by a runonce when the
    >image is booted for the first time.
    >
    >The utility I use was written in-house but there are several utilities
    >out there that can do it - NirCmd for one
    ><http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/nircmd.html>


    That's a good idea. I guess I could script it or something a la
    RunOnce. What command do you give it? I've never used NirCmd but I do
    use the other tools very regularly.

    One good hack I found after some digging was to edit the .inf driver
    for the monitor and edit out the modes you don't want (i.e., 70Hz, 72,
    Hz, 75Hz, etc.). What I am experiencing is the fuzziness that most
    LCDs do on non-native resolution with refresh rate above 60Hz. It
    doesn't look bad per se but it just does have the crispness and
    sharpness of native res or running non-native @ 60Hz. I've never seen
    an LCD look good at anything above 60Hz at my shop. I'll keep the Nir
    tool in mind. That site has the best tools for sure. Cheers!

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 14, 2012
    #16
  17. >On 2012-09-13 12:13 PM, Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP] wrote:
    >> Back in the XP days, I could capture an image at, say, 11024x768 at
    >> 60Hz, dump it to another machine whose monitor supports that
    >> resolution and it will come up at 1024x768 @ 60Hz. Since Windows 7
    >> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >> annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >>
    >> Anyone know of a hack (registry or otherwise) that prevents Win 7 from
    >> wanting to choose the highest resolution and refresh rate for you
    >> after an image dump?
    >>
    >> - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    >>

    >
    >The "Windows System Image Manager (WSIM)" which is a part of the
    >"Windows Automated Installation Kit" <
    >http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=5753
    > > & < http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5188 >

    >can be used to build up a SysPrep answer file (*.xml).
    >
    >WSIM is free and nightmarish, but it gives you granular control over
    >every step of the processes of preparing an OS with Sysprep for
    >duplication and how it should look and behave once it comes out of Sysprep.


    Yep, it is nightmareish which is why I don't use it. As I told Zaphod,
    I saw a good hack that I'm going to investigate where you just edit
    the monitor .inf file and remove the refresh rates above 60Hz. If it
    works, it's exactly what I need. Thanks for the suggestion though!

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 14, 2012
    #17
  18. >On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    >[...]
    >> Since Windows 7
    >> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >> annoying behaviors of Win 7!

    >[...]
    >
    >OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    >question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    >refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?


    Because in my environment (university), some equipment doesn't
    function right at 1920x1080p resolution (i.e., overhead display
    projectors, etc.) and they prefer around 1280x1024. Additionally, in a
    lab environment, there are folks with bad eyesight or other visual
    impairment and even at native res and refresh rate, the desktop icons
    are TINY. Too tiny. Increasing icon / font size isn't the answer btw.
    So, bumping res down a notch or two to get a "good fit" for monitor
    res is usually what I do but the refresh rate wants to stick at 75 or
    85Hz. Which is great if it is a CRT but it sucks on ANY LCD, font
    aren't as crisp and sharp. 60Hz is always the way to go for the
    sharpest and clearest experience at any resolution for LCDs in my
    experience. But, someone suggested I just hack the monitor driver .inf
    and remove the refresh rates I don't want for available resolutions
    and leave the 60Hz one. If it works, it's exactly what I need.

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 14, 2012
    #18
  19. >On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 19:57:24 -0700, Gene Wirchenko <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 22:21:54 -0400, Wolf K <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 13/09/2012 9:41 PM, Robert Sudbury wrote:
    >>>[...]
    >>>> Since Windows 7
    >>>> came out, whenever I capture and dump an image to a new machine, Win 7
    >>>> will forcibly want to use the highest resolution and the highest
    >>>> refresh rate supported by the new monitor. This is one of the most
    >>>> annoying behaviors of Win 7!
    >>>[...]
    >>>
    >>>OK, I understand what you're really on about now, and I have a serious
    >>>question: since W7 automatically selects the native resolution and
    >>>refresh rate of the monitor, why would you want to change them?

    >>
    >> For me, I have two systems using the one monitor by KVM. I
    >>prefer that they be at the same resolution. My XP system is at what
    >>it is because I like it and it is also standard for an app I maintain.

    >
    >The way I see it, your single monitor has a single native resolution
    >and both systems should be running at THAT resolution, but different
    >strokes for different folks. :)


    Maybe that works for a single end user, but in a environment where
    people have visual impairments and such, that's a fail. It's also a
    fail when an overhead project throws a 12-15' image and someone is 40'
    feet away and can't see the tiny fonts and text. Shoving "Native
    Resolution" down someone's throat that way is disingenuous at best.

    - Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP]
    Thee Chicago Wolf [MVP], Sep 14, 2012
    #19
  20. On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 23:54:04 -0500, Char Jackson <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 19:57:24 -0700, Gene Wirchenko <>
    >wrote:


    [snip]

    >> For me, I have two systems using the one monitor by KVM. I
    >>prefer that they be at the same resolution. My XP system is at what
    >>it is because I like it and it is also standard for an app I maintain.

    >
    >The way I see it, your single monitor has a single native resolution
    >and both systems should be running at THAT resolution, but different
    >strokes for different folks. :)


    Well, older eyes, too. I would rather use a lower resolution and
    be comfortable using it even if it shows less than to be squinting at
    a higher resolution. A YMMV issue to be sure.

    In related news, my taskbar is at the top.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
    Gene Wirchenko, Sep 14, 2012
    #20

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